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Program Requirements

The department offers three paths through the MA degree: a course-only degree; a course and research project degree; and a course and thesis degree. The thesis option is usually restricted to students participating in the CSPT concentration, who are required to complete a thesis. Students doing a concentration in Medieval and Early Modern Studies or Nineteenth Century Studies are required to complete a course-only degree, or course and research project degree.

Students—other than those in the CSPT, MEMS or NCS concentrations—who wish to pursue a thesis program (or, for LWC students, a thesis or alternative creative, historical, or multimedia project) must find a supervisor willing to direct their thesis or project and must submit for the approval of the Graduate Committee a proposal, a rationale for pursuing the thesis option, and a letter of support from the prospective supervisor. Students in the LWC concentration must also submit a letter of support from the LWC Area Committee Chair. If a student’s proposal is denied by the Graduate Committee, the student will have one opportunity to revise and resubmit; if the proposal is denied a second time, the student will be required to complete the course-only option or the course and research project option.

In designing their programs, students may benefit from consulting the Graduate Adviser and, if applicable, the Area Committee Chairs (for students with an interest in particular fields).

Not all Graduate English courses will be offered in a particular year. Students should consult the department to determine the courses that will be offered each year.

All courses except ENGL 500, 502, 507 and 582 are variable content.

Seminars designated as Area Courses (ENGL 505, 515, 520, 530, 540, 550, 560, 570, 571, 580, 585) offer a study of representative texts (canonical and non-canonical) in light of current scholarly debate in a given field. While remaining attentive to broader interpretive issues, Area Courses will explore some of the most vital critical methodologies now practiced in the field. In any given year, the instructor will select the works and methodologies to be studied. Students may take an Area course in a given field more than once in their program of studies only with the permission of the Graduate Adviser.

Seminars designated as Special Topic courses (ENGL 503, 504, 506, 508, 510, 516, 521, 531, 541, 551, 561, 572, 581, 586) focus on specific topics designed around the current research interests of faculty members. Students may take different Special Topics courses with the same number more than once.

Thesis-based Master’s

Course Requirements for MA

Students are required to complete 7.5 units of English graduate courses, 1.5 units of which will be ENGL 500 (Textual Studies and Methods of Research). ENGL 502 (Teaching Literature and Composition) may not be taken as one of the required courses; however, students are encouraged to take it as an extra course.

Summary of Course Requirements:
Textual Studies and Methods of Research (ENGL 500) 1.5 units
Other English Graduate courses 6.0 units
Thesis (ENGL 599) 7.5 units
Total 15.0 units

Course Requirements for MA With a Concentration in CSPT

Students accepted into the CSPT concentration are required to complete 4.5 units of English graduate courses, 1.5 units of which will be ENGL 500 (Textual Studies and Methods of Research). ENGL 502 (Teaching Literature and Composition) may not be taken as one of the required courses; however, students are encouraged to take it as an extra course. Students are also required to take CSPT 501 (Contemporary Cultural Social and Political Thought I) plus another 1.5-unit CSPT course at the 500 level (with permission of the CSPT Director, a student may substitute a graduate theory seminar taught by a CSPT faculty member in another department for the 1.5-unit CSPT course at the 500 level).

Summary of Course Requirements:
Textual Studies and Methods of Research (ENGL 500) 1.5 units
Other English Graduate courses 3.0 units
CSPT 501 1.5 units
One other CSPT course at the 500 level 1.5 units
Thesis (ENGL 599) 7.5 units
Total 15.0 units

Course Requirements for MA With a Concentration in LWC

Students accepted into the LWC concentration are required to complete 7.5 units of graduate courses, including ENGL 500 (Textual Studies and Methods of Research) for 1.5 units, and ENGL 582 (Core Seminar in Literatures of the West Coast) for 1.5 units. Of the remaining 4.5 units, 3.0 units must be LWC-tagged courses, such as those in the 583 series or those approved by the Graduate Committee, and 1.5 units may be from a department other than English, to be chosen in consultation with the LWC Area Committee Chair and with approval of the Graduate Adviser. ENGL 502 (Teaching Literature and Composition) may not be taken as one of the required courses; however, students are encouraged to take it as an extra course.

Summary of Course Requirements:
Textual Studies and Methods of Research (ENGL 500) 1.5 units
Core Seminar in Literatures of the West Coast (ENGL 582) 1.5 units
Other Graduate courses 4.5 units
Thesis (ENGL 599) 7.5 units
Total 15.0 units

Thesis

The thesis should be between 18,000 and 27,000 words, excluding notes and bibliography. For students in the CSPT concentration, the thesis must be on an approved topic within the fields of both English and CSPT, and at least two members of the supervisory committee must be drawn from the participating faculty of the CSPT program. For students in the LWC concentration, the thesis must be in the LWC area.

Other Requirements

Students must demonstrate a reading knowledge of one appropriate language other than English. The language requirement is usually fulfilled by French, German or Italian, but any other language may be substituted, after consultation with the English Graduate Adviser.

Students in the LWC concentration may use a West Coast aboriginal language to fulfill this requirement, if a qualified examiner can be found. Students also have the option of completing this requirement with at least a “B” in LING 401 (Salish) or LING 403 (Dene—Athabaskan).

Language tests are held in mid-December, mid-March, and mid-July. Students who have a second language at third-year university level on their transcript, with a minimum grade of “B” (or a “Pass,” if the course is evaluated on a “Pass” or “Fail” basis), may apply to the Department Graduate Adviser for a waiver of the language test.

Students can satisfy the language requirement in French, German, or Italian by passing FRAN 300, GMST 405 (formerly GER 390) or ITAL 300 respectively (if offered). The minimum passing grade in these courses is “B” (or a “Pass,” if the course is evaluated on a “Pass” or “Fail” basis). Students who wish to prepare for the language requirement by taking online courses offered at other institutions are still required to write the language test.

Oral Examination

At the final two-hour oral examination, the student gives a 15-20 minute presentation about the thesis, and then answers questions from the Examining Committee and from the general audience.

Program Length

With a good Honours BA or a strong Major in English, a full-time student could finish the thesis MA program in 12 months; however, most students take at least 16 months.

Course-only Master’s

Course Requirements for MA

Students are required to complete 15.0 units of English graduate courses, 1.5 units of which will be ENGL 500 (Textual Studies and Methods of Research). ENGL 502 (Teaching Literature and Composition) may be taken as 1.5 units of the required courses.

Concentration in LWC

Of the 15.0 units of English graduate courses, students doing a concentration in LWC are required to complete a minimum of 6.0 units of courses in the area of Literatures of the West Coast, including ENGL 582 (Core Seminar in Literatures of the West Coast) for 1.5 units. The remaining 4.5 units must be LWC-tagged courses, such as those in the 583 series or those approved by the Graduate Committee; 1.5 units may be from a department other than English, to be chosen in consultation with the LWC Area Committee Chair and with approval from the Graduate Adviser. Depending on course availability, the course-only LWC concentration can take more than 12 months to complete.

Concentration in MEMS

Of the 15.0 units of English graduate courses, students doing a concentration in MEMS are required to complete a minimum of 6.0 units of courses in the medieval and/or early modern areas (choosing from ENGL 510, 515, 516, 520, 521, 530, and 531; if necessary, and if the usual conditions are met, students can also obtain concentration credit through Directed Studies or by taking interdisciplinary courses in the Medieval Studies Program). Depending on course availability, the course-only MEMS concentration can take more than 12 months to complete.

Concentration in NCS

Of the 15.0 units of English graduate courses, students doing a concentration in NCS are required to complete a minimum of 6.0 units of courses in the Nineteenth Century Studies areas, such as ENGL 550 and 551, and those approved by the Graduate Committee. Depending on course availability, the course-only NCS concentration can take more than 12 months to complete.

Summary of Course Requirements:
Textual Studies and Methods of Research (ENGL 500) 1.5 units
Other Graduate courses 13.5 units
Total 15.0 units

Other Requirements

Students must demonstrate a reading knowledge of one appropriate language other than English. The language requirement is usually fulfilled by French, German, or Italian, but any other language may be substituted, after consultation with the English Graduate Adviser.

Students in the LWC concentration may use a West Coast aboriginal language to fulfill this requirement if a qualified examiner can be found. Students also have the option of completing this requirement with at least a “B” in LING 401 (Salish) or LING 403 (Dene-Athabaskan).

Students in the MEMS concentration will normally fulfill the language requirement by a language (Latin, French, Spanish, Italian, etc.) appropriate to both the concentration and the student’s particular interest. The language should be chosen in consultation with the Graduate Adviser or with the student’s Supervisor.

Language tests are held in mid-December, mid-March, and mid-July. Students who have a second language at third-year university level on their transcript, with a minimum grade of “B” (or a “Pass,” if the course is evaluated on a “Pass” or “Fail” basis), may apply to the Department Graduate Adviser for a waiver of the language test.

Students can satisfy the language requirement in French, German, or Italian by passing FRAN 300, GMST 405 (formerly GER 390), or ITAL 300 respectively (if offered). The minimum passing grade in these courses is “B” (or a “Pass,” if the course is evaluated on a “Pass” or “Fail” basis). Students who wish to prepare for the language requirement by taking online courses offered at other institutions are still required to write the language test.

Program Length

With a good Honours BA or a strong Major in English, a full-time student could finish the course-only MA program in 12 months; however, most students take at least 16 months.

Project-based Master’s

Course Requirements for MA

Students are required to complete 10.5 units of English graduate courses, 1.5 units of which will be ENGL 500 (Textual Studies and Methods of Research). ENGL 502 (Teaching Literature and Composition) may be taken as 1.5 units of the required courses.

Concentration in LWC

Of the 10.5 units of English graduate courses, students doing a concentration in LWC are required to complete ENGL 582 (Core Seminar in Literatures of the West Coast) for 1.5 units, and 3.0 units of LWC-tagged courses, such as those in the 583 series or those approved by the Graduate Committee; 1.5 units may be from a department other than English, to be chosen in consultation with the LWC Area Committee Chair and with approval from the Graduate Adviser.

Concentration in MEMS

Of the 10.5 units of English graduate courses, students doing a concentration in MEMS are required to complete a minimum of 4.5 units of courses in the medieval and/or early modern areas (choosing from ENGL 510, 515, 516, 520, 521, 530, and 531; if necessary, and if the usual conditions are met, students can also obtain concentration credit through Directed Studies or by taking interdisciplinary courses in the Medieval Studies Program).

Concentration in NCS

Of the 10.5 units of English graduate courses, students doing a concentration in NCS are required to complete a minimum of 4.5 units of courses in the Nineteenth Century Studies areas, such as ENGL 550 and 551, and those approved by the Graduate Committee. Depending on course availability, the project-based NCS concentration can take more than 12 months to complete.

Summary of Course Requirements:
Textual Studies and Methods of Research (ENGL 500) 1.5 units
Other English Graduate courses 9.0 units
Master’s Essay (ENGL 598) 4.5 units
Total 15.0 units

Final Project

Students will complete a Master’s Essay (not to exceed 10,000 words, excluding notes and bibliography) worth 4.5 units. The paper must present an original and cogent argument, and demonstrate the student’s research and writing abilities. For students doing a concentration in LWC, MEMS, or NCS, the topic must be in the relevant concentration areas, as determined by the Graduate Adviser.

Other Requirements

Students must demonstrate a reading knowledge of one appropriate language other than English. The language requirement is usually fulfilled by French, German, or Italian, but any other language may be substituted after consultation with the English Graduate Adviser.

Students in the LWC concentration may use a West Coast aboriginal language to fulfill this requirement, if a qualified examiner can be found. Students also have the option of completing this requirement with at least a “B” in LING 401 (Salish) or LING 403 (Dene-Athabaskan).

Students in the MEMS concentration will normally fulfill the language requirement by a language (Latin, French, Spanish, Italian, etc.) appropriate to both the concentration and the student’s particular interest. The language should be chosen in consultation with the Graduate Adviser or with the student’s Supervisor.

Language tests are held in mid-December, mid-March, and mid-July. Students who have a second language at third-year university level on their transcript, with a minimum grade of “B” (or a “Pass,” if the course is evaluated on a “Pass” or “Fail” basis), may apply to the Department Graduate Adviser for a waiver of the language test.

Students can satisfy the language requirement in French, German, or Italian by passing FRAN 300, GMST 405 (formerly GER 390), or ITAL 300 respectively (if offered). The minimum passing grade in these courses is “B” (or a “Pass,” if the course is evaluated on a “Pass” or “Fail” basis). Students who wish to prepare for the language requirement by taking online courses offered at other institutions are still required to write the language test.

Oral Examination

At the final one and a half- hour oral examination, the student gives a brief 15-minute presentation on the Master’s Essay, and then answers questions from the Examining Committee and from the general audience.

Program Length

With a good Honours BA or a strong Major in English, a full-time student could finish the project-based MA program in 12 months; however, some students take at least 16 months.

PhD Program

Course Requirements

Students are required to complete 6.0 units of English graduate courses beyond those taken as part of an MA program. 1.5 of these units will be ENGL 500 (Textual Studies and Methods of Research), unless a student has already taken it or its equivalent. Students may be required to take courses in areas in which they are deficient. PhD students are not permitted to take ENGL 502 (Teaching Literature and Composition) as one of their required courses; however, they are encouraged to take it as an extra course.

Students accepted into the CSPT concentration must substitute CSPT 601 (Contemporary Cultural Social and Political Thought II) for 1.5 of the English graduate units. They may also substitute a CSPT or cross-listed CSPT course for another 1.5 of the English graduate units.

Summary of Course Requirements:
English Graduate courses 6.0 units
Candidacy Examination (ENGL 693) 6.0 units
Dissertation (ENGL 699) 18.0 units*
Total 30.0 units*

* Minimum.

Candidacy

Within twenty four months of registration as a doctoral candidate and at least six months before the final oral examination, a student must pass a “candidacy examination”. This examination consists of two sections:

  1. a Major Field Examination on the area of the student’s specialization, based on a reading list set by the department and reviewed annually; in consultation with the Chair of their Examining Committee and with the approval of the department’s Graduate Committee, candidates may designate texts of particular interest and thereby minimally tailor the exam to their expertise.
  2. a Focused Field Examination on a sub-field directly related to the candidate’s anticipated dissertation research, based on a reading list established in consultation with the Chair of the student’s Examining Committee and approved by the department’s Graduate Committee.

Each examination has two components: a written paper and an oral examination. Students must pass both the written and oral components in order to pass a candidacy examination.

Students who have been accepted into the CSPT concentration must write either the Major Field or Focused Field Examination in the CSPT area, and at least two of the committee members for this examination must participate in the CSPT concentration. CSPT will set the exam format and reading list, and will handle the administration of the exam.

Students must pass the Candidacy Examination before advancing to the Dissertation Prospectus and before registering in the Dissertation (ENGL 699).

Dissertation Prospectus

The Dissertation Prospectus will normally be completed in the first term of the third year of registration as a doctoral candidate. The Prospectus must be written in consultation with the student’s Supervisor and Supervisory Committee, and must be approved by all members of the Supervisory Committee before further work on the Dissertation begins.

The Dissertation Prospectus and approval process consists of two parts, one written and one oral:

  1. a substantial essay and bibliography setting forth the nature of the dissertation project and its anticipated arguments and value.
  2. an oral Prospectus Conference with the student’s Supervisory Committee to identify key strengths and weaknesses of, and to gain final approval of, the proposed dissertation research as outlined in the Dissertation Prospectus. The student must provide a written summary of this Conference to the members of the Supervisory Committee, for their endorsement, prior to commencing the Dissertation.

Other Requirements

Language Requirement - Students must demonstrate a reading knowledge of two appropriate languages other than English. The -language requirement is usually fulfilled by French or German, but any other language may be substituted, after consultation with the English Graduate Adviser, if it is appropriate to the student’s dissertation topic. Students who are judged by the Graduate Adviser to have advanced competence in one language may have one of the second language requirements waived.

Language tests are held in mid-December, mid-March, and mid-July. Students who have a second language at third-year university level on their transcript, with a minimum grade of “B” (or a “Pass,” if the course is evaluated on a “Pass” or “Fail” basis), may apply to the Department Graduate Adviser for a waiver of the language test.

Students can satisfy the language requirement in French or in German by passing FRAN 300 or GMST 405 (formerly GER 390) respectively (if offered). Students who have received permission from the Graduate Adviser to use Italian as one of their second languages can satisfy the language requirement in Italian by passing ITAL 300. The minimum passing grade in these courses is “B” (or a “Pass,” if the course is evaluated on a “Pass” or “Fail” basis). Students who wish to prepare for the language requirement by taking online courses offered at other institutions are still required to write the language test.

Instructional Experience - As an integral part of their program, PhD students are usually expected to undertake teaching duties within the department.

Dissertation

The dissertation is expected to be a sophisticated work of the highest possible caliber, and potentially publishable, and should be between 60,000-120,000 words (excluding notes and bibliography).

For students in the CSPT concentration, the dissertation must be on an approved topic within the fields of both English and CSPT, and at least two members of the supervisory committee must be drawn from the participating faculty of the CSPT program.

Oral Examination

At the final three-hour oral examination, the student gives a 20-minute presentation about the dissertation, and then answers questions from the Examining Committee and from the general audience.

Program Length

Although the University allows students a seven-year period within which to complete their PhD degree, students who wish to be competitive in the job market and in postdoctoral and other grant applications should aim at completing their doctoral program in four to five years.

Graduate Certificate in Digital Humanities

The Faculty of Humanities, in partnership with the Digital Humanities Summer Institute and its network, offers a Graduate Certificate in Digital Humanities. Bringing together computational methods and theories with humanities research and pedagogy, this program offers post-graduates, graduate students, academics, librarians and those in extra-academic sectors expertise in the digital dimensions of humanities research in text-, image-, and sound-based media toward proficiency in areas such as computing and information management, multimedia communication, social computing, game design, analysis and data visualization, digital remediation and curation, prototyping, encoding and data processing, and beyond.

Digital Humanities is fundamentally interdisciplinary, engaging fields such as literature, language, history, social justice and the arts. In this context, digital tools are developed, tested and used to support innovative analysis and new conventions for representation, documentation, narration, and expression.

Certificate Requirements

DHUM 501, 502, 503, 504, 505 7.5

 

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