PROGRAM EVALUATION

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Partnership Programs Evaluation Summary [PDF]

First Nations communities are linked by certain historical events and current political objectives. Yet they encompass many different realities that reflect tribal ancestry, geographic location, and a host of varying socio-economic conditions. The destinations envisioned by partnering bands and tribal councils in the First Nations Partnership Programs were not identical, and no two programs looked exactly alike. This is both the fundamental strength and the challenge of the partnership approach.

Over a two-year period, data were gathered and analyzed to capture the experiences of representative groups of people involved in each of the training programs between 1989 and 1999. A social participatory approach was used, asking each partner community to contribute questions that would yield feedback of interest to their agenda. The impacts of the training program across groups of program participants were uncovered by an ecologically comprehensive research methodology that included qualitative and quantitative data collection strategies, including:

  • semi-structured individual and group interviews;
  • structured questionnaires;
  • focus groups of program administrators;
  • participatory observations in partnering communities and post-secondary institutions;
  • community fora;
  • Early Childhood Educator fora; and
  • review of records created by all seven partnerships.

Findings are based on interpretation of 290 transcribed interviews and supporting documents. Cross-sectional data analyses were used for comparisons across partnerships and across a sample of mainstream college programs in which some First Nations students were enrolled. These comparisons helped us to identify factors that contributed to different kinds of challenges and successes in program delivery and outcomes. Evaluation findings highlighted here are based on the voices of program participants, as well as the experiences of the university-based team who worked alongside them.

A brief overview of findings is provided here. More detailed reports have been published elsewhere (See resources published after 1998).

The program evaluation conducted from 1998-2000 built upon formative evaluations which assessed the first two partnerships. These evaluations shed light on the impacts of the training program on social cohesion, particularly on the re-instatement of Elders to positions of influence and respect in community life. (To receive copies of these formative evaluations, see Program Contacts.)



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FNPP home page
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FNPP Overview
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First Nations Partnership Programs: Background
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First Nations Self-Determination
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Program Philosophy - Paradigm Shift
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Generative Curriculum Model  Bicultural Program
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Capacity Building
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Bicultural Partnership
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Community-based delivery
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Community-based Child and Youth Care Diploma Program
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Courses and course descriptions
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Intergenerational Teaching and	Learning
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Intergenerational Facilitation
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Program evaluation - funders, methods, and findings
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Program Outcomes
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Educational Outcomes
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Vocational Outcomes/ Community	Development
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Cultural healing
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Social Cohesion and Social Inclusion/ Community Development
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Web Resources and Linksspacer
FNPP publications
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FNPP contacts
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First Nations child

References:
D.I. Jette (1993) Meadow Lake Tribal Council Indian Child Care Program Evaluation. Unpublished Manuscript, Meadow Lake Tribal Council, Saskatchewan; P. Cook (1993) Curriculum Evaluation for the MLTC/SCYC Career Ladder Project. Unpublished manuscript, School of Child and Youth Care, University of Victoria; R. Regan & A. Kimble (1994) The Cowichan Tribes Early Childhood Education/Child and Youth Care Career Ladder Project. Unpublished report to the Centre for Curriculum and Professional Development, Victoria: A. Pence & M. McCallum (1994) Towards an inclusionary approach in defining quality. In P. Moss & A. Pence (eds) Valuing Quality in Early Childhood Services: New Approaches to Defining Quality. London: Paul Chapman.

The summative program evaluation conducted between 1998-2000 confirmed that the generative potential of the partnership process lay, in part, in:

  • the steps taken to involve as many community members as possible;
  • the richness of cultural inputs from all parties; and
  • the circumscribed focus of our engagement together upon securing children's well-being as a 'point of contact' and as a 'way into' effecting community and institutional changes on a broader scale.

Program evaluation does not mark the end of the story, but an informative viewpoint along the way for ourselves and our First Nations partners -- and a promising new place to start for those involved in policy, program development and direct practice addressing children's well-being in cultural communities.

Ball, J. & Pence, A. (2001) "Program Evaluation Report: Strengthening Community Capacity for Early Childhood Care and Development" Victoria: First Nations Partnership Programs, University of Victoria.

    Due to the large size of this PDF file, we have broken it into four smaller files for your convenience.
  • Part 1: (16.4 MB) includes Contents, Executive Summary, Introduction, FNPP, Program Evaluation Research
  • Part 2: (16.3 MB) Program Evaluation Findings, A: Program Delivery Processes
  • Part 3: (34.4 MB) Program Evaluation Findings, B: Program Outcomes
  • Part 4: (8.4 MB) Extending the Program Reach

See also
       Capacity Building
       Intergenerational Learning
       Vocational Outcomes
       Educational Outcomes