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Robin Skelton | VOX Alumni

New researcher joins
"young, dynamic" physics faculty

Robert Kowalewski’s life-long interest in fundamental science and his search for answers to explain the origins of the universe have led him from his home town of Buffalo, New York, to Geneva and now to the University of Victoria where, in August, he joined the faculty of the department of physics as an assistant professor.

Kowalewski spent the last eight years in Geneva doing research at CERN (the European Centre for Particle Research) first with Carleton University, then with the CERN lab and most recently with the University of Geneva. His research focuses on the physics of the b quark in order to better understand the symmetries between matter and anti-matter.

He chose UVic because of the "young and dynamic" faculty members in the physics department’s High Energy Physics Group who share an interest in discovering, through experimental particle physics, the basic beginnings of the world.

"Our goal is to find out what the world is made of and how it works. With this understanding we can get insights into what the universe was like very shortly after its creation and how it evolved to its current state," Kowalewski says. "We are trying to understand the various constituents of matter and how they interact. It’s curiosity-driven research in collaboration with scientists across the hall and across the world."

Kowalewski is involved in two major international research collaborations: the OPAL experiment at CERN, employing the world’s largest particle collider; and BaBar, a new detector under construction at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Centre (SLAC) to measure the breakdown of symmetry between matter and anti-matter.

Community-based forestry

A report released in July by UVic’s Eco-Research Chair of Environmental Law and Policy recommends a major shift from corporate to community-based forest tenures. The report, "Forests in Trust," made 48 recommendations for change in the province’s forest tenure system. Central to the report is the proposal for the Community Forest Trust Act which enables communities to put local crown land in trust and manage it according to ecosystem-based principles.

"This report offers real solutions for reconciling conflicting interests over the use of forest resources in B.C. Its timing is critical to the province," says the principal author of the report, Cheri Burda.

"The Community Forests Trust Act is exactly what this planet and this province needs," says Eco-Research Chair Dr. Michael M’Gonigle. "It leads to dramatic ecologically-based changes, but it does so in a gradual fashion, and brings all members of the community together in the process."

Contents | Grading Technology | Space Studies |
Editorial | Eureka! | Around the Ring |
Call for Nominations | Alumni News | Development News |
Travel | Keeping in Touch | Where are You Now? |
Robin Skelton | VOX Alumni