Alexandra D’Arcy’s quick links          

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publications & presentations

 

Did you ever see my blog on the OUP website?

 

Š February 2010: Ode to a prescriptivist (in honour of my Grandmother, Grace D’Arcy, who taught me to love language)

Š March 2010: What is it you do? (about being a linguist)

Š April 2010: Liking (or at least understanding) like: Part I (an introduction to ‘like’)

Š July 2010: Liking (or at least understanding) like: Part II (a follow up in which I discuss the work ‘like’ does)

 

 

PUBLICATIONS (2012 onward; see my cv for complete history and details)

 

in the works

Š to appear. Joining the western region: Sociophonetic shift in Victoria (with R. Roeder & S. Onosson). Journal of English Linguistics.

Š to appear. The relevance of variationist sociolinguistics for World Englishes. In D. Schreier, M. Hundt & E.W. Schneider (eds.), The Cambridge Handbook of World Englishes. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

 

2017

* Discourse-Pragmatic Variation in Context: Eight Hundred Years of like. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. [publisher’s link]

 

2016

* Outliers, impact and rationalization in linguistic change (with S.A .Tagliamonte & C. Rodríguez Louro). Language 92.4. 824-849.

 

2015

* Stability, stasis and change: The longue durée of intensification. Diachronica 32.4. 449-493.

* Quotation and advances in understanding syntactic systems. Annual Review of Linguistics 1.1. 43-61.

* Not always variable: Probing the vernacular grammar (with S.A. Tagliamonte). Language Variation and Change 27.3. 255-285.

* At the crossroads of change: Possession, periphrasis, and prescriptivism in Victoria English. In P. Collins (ed.), Grammatical Change in English World-Wide. Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins. 43-64. [publisher’s link]

* Variation, transmission, incrementation. In P. Honeybone & J. Salmons (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Historical Phonology. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 583-602. [book website; publisher’s link]

 

2014

* Functional partitioning and possible limits on variability: A view of adjective comparison from the vernacular. Journal of English Linguistics 42.3. 318-344.

* Discourse. In C. Bowern & B. Evans (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Historical Linguistics. New York: Routledge. 410-422. [publisher’s link]

 

2013

* Proceedings from the XIVth International Conference on Methods in Dialectology, 2011 (with Alena Barysevich & David Heap, eds.). Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang. xiii + 348. [publisher’s link]

* Asymmetrical trajectories: The past and present of –body/–one (with B. Haddican, H. Richards, S.A. Tagliamonte, & A. Taylor). Language Variation and Change 25.3: 287-310.

* Variation and change. In R. Bayley, R. Cameron & C. Lucas (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Sociolinguistics. New York: Oxford University Press. 484-502. [publisher’s link]

* Advances in sociolinguistic transcription methods. In C. Mallinson, B. Childs & G. Van Herk (eds.), Data Collection in Sociolinguistics: Methods and Applications. New York: Routledge. 187-190. [publisher’s link]

 

2012

* Ethics and social media: Implications for sociolinguistics in the networked public (with Taylor Marie Young). Journal of Sociolinguistics 16.4. 532-546.

* The diachrony of quotation: Evidence from New Zealand English. Language Variation and Change 24.3. 343-369.

* Frequency and variation in the community grammar: Tracking a new change through the generations (with S.A. Tagliamonte). In D. Biber & R. Ripen (eds.), Corpus Linguistics. London: Sage. 239-258. [reprint]

* Like and language ideology: Disentangling fact from fiction. In S. Blum (ed.), Making Sense of Language. Readings in Culture and Communication. 2nd ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 443-458. [reprint]

 

 

downloadable phonology papers, .pdf (also available via the TWPL website):

* Unconditional neutrality: Vowel harmony in a two-place model. 2004. Toronto Working Papers in Linguistics 23.2. 1-46.

* Yowlumne reexamined: A challenge for contrastive specification. 2003. Toronto Working Papers in Linguistics 20. 21-46.

 

 

PRESENTATIONS (2012 onward; see my cv for complete history and details)

 

in the works

* Expanding the quotative dialectic: Evidence from indirect quotation (with I. Enríquez García). American Dialect Society. Salt Lake City. January 2018.

* Language history and linguistic corpora: Perspectives on like and the like. Plenary presentation at Spanish Association for Corpus Linguistics X. University of Extremadura. May 2018.

* What the kids can tell us about language change. Plenary presentation at International Computer Archive of Modern and Medieval English 39. University of Tampere. June 2018.

 

2017

* Diachronic insights to colliding changes (with Ildara Enríquez García). American Dialect Society. Austin TX.

* The life cycle of research and the ‘ethics police’. American Dialect Society. Austin TX.

* At the cusp of change. Keynote presentation at Canada 150 Celebration. Department of Linguistics, University of Toronto.

* I didn’t learn like grammar: Discourse, society and language change. Plenary presentation at the Northwest Linguistics Conference 33. University of British Columbia.

* Change and the longue durée. Plenary presentation at Studies in the History of the English Language 10. University of Kansas.

* Habitual behaviours: Teasing apart the variable contexts of the English past habitual (with D. Denis & E. Larson). New Ways of Analyzing Variation 46. University of Wisconsin Madison.

* Individuals, communities and the sociolinguistic canon (with S.A. Tagliamonte). New Ways of Analyzing Variation 46. University of Wisconsin Madison.

 

2016

* Think-een about (ING) (with Nicole Rosen & Jillian Ankutowicz). American Dialect Society, Washington, DC.

* A comparative diachrony of utterance-final tags in Canadian English (with Derek Denis). Cascadia Workshop in Sociolinguistics, University of Washington.

* Deconstructed functionality: Confirmational variation in Canadian English through time (with Derek Denis & Martina Wiltschko). Discourse-Pragmatic Variation and Change, University of Ottawa.

* Reconfiguring quotation over the longue durée. International Conference on English Historical Linguistics (ICEHL-19). University of Duisburg-Essen.

* Spoken quotation and general questions of language change. Invited colloquium, Language Variation and Change Colloquium Series, Department of Linguistics, University of Indiana Bloomington.

* Charting the grammaticalization trajectory of right (with Derek Denis & Martina Wiltschko). NWAV 45, University of Victoria and Simon Fraser University.

 

2015

* City, province, or region? What do the vowels of Victoria English tell us? (with Sky Onosson & Becky Roeder). American Dialect Society, Portland OR.

* Old njooz or new nooz? A diachronic look at yod dropping (with Janelle Serediak). American Dialect Society, Portland OR.

* Boys don’t increment—or do they? Department of Linguistics, University of Washington.

* Input, homogeneity, and stuff (like that) (with Derek Denis). Studies in Historical English Linguistics (SHEL) 9, University of British Columbia.

* Tracing like and the like. 14th International Pragmatics Conference, Antwerp, Belgium.

* Corpora, Canadian English, the longue durée, and stuff like that (with Derek Denis). La Science du Mot, University of Victoria.

* Simultaneous innovation and conservation: Unpacking Victoria’s vowels (with Sky Onosson & Becky Roeder). NWAV 44, University of Toronto.

* Deriving variation in function: A case study of Canadian eh and its kin (with Martina Wiltschko). NWAV 44, University of Toronto.

 

2014

* Outliers, impact, and rationalization (with Celeste Rodríguez Louro & Sali Tagliamonte). LSA 88, Minneapolis, MN.

* Stability, stasis, and change. Discourse-Pragmatic Variation and Change (DiPVaC) 2, Newcastle University.

* What have we been do-een? (ING) is not binary (with Nicole Rosen & Jillian Ankutowicz). Change and Variation in Canada (CVC) 8, Queens University.

* Homogeneity, convergence, mega-trends, and stuff like that (with Derek Denis). NWAV 43, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign & University of Chicago.

* In a sea of Canadian English: Victoria’s linguistic legacy. Plenary lecture at Linguistic Association of Canada and the United States (LACUS), University of British Columbia.

 

2013

* Matters of counting: When corpus linguistics meets variationist sociolinguistics. Department of Linguistics, University of Hawai‘i at Manoa.

* The incrementation problem: What we know, what we think we know, and what we have yet to confirm. Department of Linguistics, University of Western Australia.

* The absolutely fabulous (recent) history of intensification. Invited paper at Language Variation and Change in Australia (LVC-A) 1, La Trobe University.

* So slow yet totally frenetic: Intensification in longitudinal perspective. Studies in the History of English (SHEL) 8, Brigham Young University. (see D’Arcy 2015 in Diachronica)

* Does one change have ramifications for the other? NWAV 42, University of Pittsburgh & Carnegie Mellon University.

* Global perspectives on linguistic innovation (with Celeste Rodríguez Louro & Sali Tagliamonte). NWAV 42, University of Pittsburgh & Carnegie Mellon University. (see Tagliamonte, D’Arcy & Rodríguez Louro 2016 in Language)

 

2012

* Vernacular repercussions of adaptive change (with Sali Tagliamonte). NWAV 41, Indiana University Bloomington. (see D’Arcy & Tagliamonte 2015 in Language Variation and Change)

* Having ramifications: When developmental trajectories clash. 17th International Conference on English Historical Linguistics (ICEHL-17), Universität Zürich. (see D’Arcy 2015 in Grammatical Change in English World-Wide)

* Transmission, incrementation, and the progression of change: It’s all about the peak. Plenary lecture at Sociolinguistics Workshop, Universität Basel.

* Counting matters. Plenary lecture at Discourse-Pragmatic Variation and Change, University of Salford.

* Mining corpora for discourse-pragmatic variation. Invited workshop at Discourse-Pragmatic Variation and Change, University of Salford.

* Incrementing generational change: Men, women, and Labov. Department of Linguistics, Simon Fraser University.

* Be like: A critical feature for variation theory, not just linguistic fluff. Department of Linguistics, University of British Columbia.

* Tracing our linguistic roots: On being Victorian, and Canadian. Invited Lecture to be presented at the 50th Anniversary Deans’ Lecture Series, Legacy Arts Gallery, University of Victoria.

 

 

[last update: September 23, 2017]