Now we turn to such topics as intromission and extramission, subjective and objective sense perception, and mirror-images. What do we learn from medieval theories of optics? And how might they add to our understanding of literary images and moral vision? These are the sciences of the self.

  1. Chaucer, The Knight’s Tale and Miller’s Tale
  2. Chaucer, Merchant’s Tale
  3. Russell, “The Emergence of Physiological Optics,” pp. 672-89, in vol. 2 of Encyclopedia of the History of Arabic Science (handout)
  4. Lindberg, “The Western Reception of Arabic Optics,” pp. 716-29, in vol. 2 of Encyclopedia of the History of Arabic Science (handout)
  5. Benvenutus Grassus, The Wonderful Art of the Eye: A Critical Edition of the Middle English Translation of his De Probatissima Arte Oculorum (excerpts to be circulated)
  6. Peter of Limoges, The Moral Treatise of the Eye (alternative reading if available)

Diagram of the seven tunics and three humours of the eye, with parts of the head. British Library, Sloane 981, f. 68

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