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Issues

Our Back Pages:
Issue #39, July 1976

Issue #39In the reviews section of Issue #39, the past and the present collide. Here G.V. Downes, a.k.a. Gwladys V. Downes, poet and critic, reviews four books, two of which are Susan Musgrave’s The Impstone and Dorothy Livesay’s Woman’s Eye. Take on the challenge of six degrees of separation, and quite quickly Livesay is linked to Musgrave through her recent editing of Force Field: 77 BC Women Poets (Mother Tongue Publishing, 2013) in which Livesay’s Women’s Eye: 12 B. C. Poets is recalled as the last book of women’s writing published in B.C. thirty-five years ago.

Following the success of our 50 Issues Project, in which we highlighted select back issues in honour of the University of Victoria’s 50th anniversary, we decided to cast our gaze back, chronologically, over our complete backlist…to include (eventually!) brief reviews of every issue not previously covered. Featured issues will be highlighted on our website biweekly.

Continue reading about this week's featured issue (write-up by Yvonne Blomer).


E-Newsletter

Malahat lite: December 2014 Edition

Evan JonesThe last e-newsletter of 2014 highlights Translation Issue 188 goodies, Long Poem Prize details, and more!

Interviews: Anita Lahey, Evan Jones, Alice Major, all judges for the 2015 Long Poem Prize, discuss the value of poetry and their thoughts on submissions; Autumn 2014 issue poetry contributor Erín Moure talks the nuances of translation with volunteer Robin Reniero; and CNF Contest winner Rebecca Foust lets us in on her memoir, "Venn Diagram," in conversation with volunteer Jake Hólm.

Features: holiday subscription special! Spend $15 for a one-year subscription (new or renew) for friends or family; call for CNF submissions to a special themed issue; and more.

Discover this month's edition of Malahat lite.


News

Call For Submissions: Creative Nonfiction Issue

CNF IssueReality check: The Malahat Review is calling all Canadian creative nonfiction writers to submit works for Elusive Boundaries: Mapping CNF in Canada, a special themed issue dedicated entirely to creative nonfiction, set for publication in Winter 2015/16. Writer and professor Lynne Van Luven will act as guest editor for the issue.

While we welcome all works of creative nonfiction, the Malahat also invites Canada’s creative nonfictionists to think critically about their practice. Thoughtful essays about the genre will be considered as well as for reviews of works in creative nonfiction by Canadian authors for Elusive Boundaries. There will also be online exclusives—interviews, etc.—posted on the Malahat website when the print issue is published. Deadline for submissions is July 1, 2015.

Click here for full submission details.


Contests

2015 Long Poem Prize: Meet the Judges

Alice MajorWith the Long Poem Prize deadline sneaking up (February 1, 2015), we'd like to introduce this year's judges!

Evan Jones, Anita Lahey and Alice Major, all accomplished, award-winning writers, are set to read Long Poem contest entries for 2015. Take a look at the Judge biography page to learn a little more about each author.

While you're there, consider sending in an entry to the contest! Submissions consist of a single poem or cycle of poems between 10 and 20 pages long. All entries come with a complimentary 1-year subscription or renewal extension. What's up for grabs? Two prizes of $,1000 plus publication!

Read about the Long Poem Prize Judges for 2015.


Issues

Our Back Pages:
Issue #38, April 1976

Issue #38Published in April 1976, Issue #38 of The Malahat Review features an eclectic mix of primarily contemporary to-the-times writings. One notable exception is a translation of Les Fiancailles (The Betrothal), a poem written in 1908 by Apollinaire, an acknowledged leader of the literary avant garde. This poem is from his 1913 collection Alcools, and is dedicated to Picasso.

Following the success of our 50 Issues Project, in which we highlighted select back issues in honour of the University of Victoria’s 50th anniversary, we decided to cast our gaze back, chronologically, over our complete backlist…to include (eventually!) brief reviews of every issue not previously covered. Featured issues will be highlighted on our website biweekly.

Continue reading about this week's featured issue (write-up by Gae VanSiri).


Interviews

Momentum Over Precision: An Interview with Patrick Friesen on Translating Danish Poetry

Patrick FriesenIssue 188, At Home in Translation: Canadians Translate the World is a culmination of three years of work, with international poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, and book reviews. To celebrate its release, The Malahat Review has posted exclusive web content to the site, including interviews, essays and translated works. View the Table of Contents for details on contributors, and to purchase a copy of Issue 188 in translation.

In this interview, Malahat volunteer Katie Weaver talks with Patrick Friesen about his translations of Ulrikka Gernes' Danish poetry, his stylistic approaches to form and technique, and the pros (and cons) of co-translating with friend and translator P. K. Brask. Friesen's four translations appear in Issue 188.

KW: As I'm reading your translations of Ulrikka Gernes’ four poems, I'm thinking about how often a directly-translated text doesn't make as much sense or doesn't read as nicely as it would in its own language. Did you end up taking any artistic liberties with the pieces? How much? Did you feel right or wrong in doing so?

PF: A few days ago my wife mentioned that Amichai had said about translation that it was a bit like kissing one's bride through a veil. That suggests something fundamental about translation, that it is always an approximation of the first-hand experience. This is obvious; each language has its uniqueness, and some of the uniqueness can't be translated. I suppose the fundamental question a translator has to ask, and answer, is "do I want to do as literal a translation as possible, or do I want to make the writing in question work in my language as well as it worked in its original language?" We've all seen stiff, awkward translations where an attempt has been made to duplicate the original. I'm not interested in this kind of translation. The poem has to work in English.

Read the full interview with Patrick Friesen.


Subscriptions

Holiday Subscription Sale: One Year for $15

SnowflakesIt's the most wonderful time of the year!

As we enter the holiday season, The Malahat Review is offering discounted one-year subscriptions (or subscription renewals) to all readers young or old, new or well-read. Regular one-year subscriptions range from $35 to $45 - that's a savings of up to $30!

Shop early for friends and family this year (or yourself!), and save! Discount offer ends January 31, 2015.

Visit our holiday subscription page to purchase.


Issues

Mirror, Mirror: Thoraya El-Rayyes Translates Arab Writer Hisham Bustani's Flash Fiction

Thoraya El-RayyesTo celebrate The Malahat Review's Autumn 2014 Translation Issue, we've been posting exclusive content to our website from writers all over the globe. This week features "Mirror Mirror," a flash fiction piece by Hisham Bustani and translated from the Arabic by Thoraya El-Rayyes (pictured).

Bustani is the author of four short fiction collections and is acclaimed for his contemporary themes, style, and language. The German review Inamo selected him as one of the Arab world’s emerging and influential new writers. He lives in Amman, Jordan. El-Rayyes is a Canadian-Palestinian literary translator based in Amman, Jordan. Her Arabic translation of the children’s book Because It Is Also Your Story is forthcoming.

1
The actor is on a stage. The stage is a vast wasteland without a trace of shadow.
He throws his voice to the back of the chamber, it bounces back and knocks him down:
the end of the chamber is right in front of his nose.
Wherever he runs and throws sound, walls close in on him at once.

Continue reading El-Rayyes' translation of Bustani's flash fiction.


Issues

Our Back Pages:
Issue #37, January 1976

Issue #37It seems serendipitous to be reading Issue 37, an issue comprised entirely of Austrian writing in translation, when the Malahat’s Translation Issue (188) has just been released. The new harkens back to the Malahat’s origins of a global approach to literature that Robin Skelton built into the journal’s foundation.

Guest editor, and later Malahat editor from 1992 to 1998, Derk Wynand translated seven of the pieces, both poems and prose. The influence of these Austrian writers is apparent in Wynand’s work.

Following the success of our 50 Issues Project, in which we highlighted select back issues in honour of the University of Victoria’s 50th anniversary, we decided to cast our gaze back, chronologically, over our complete backlist…to include (eventually!) brief reviews of every issue not previously covered. Featured issues will be highlighted on our website biweekly.

Continue reading about this week's featured issue (write-up by Yvonne Blomer).


Contests

Long Poem Prize: Call for Submissions

Long Poem PrizeThe Malahat's biennial Long Poem Prize is now open for entries!

While the deadline is still a 'long' way away (February 1, 2015), we encourage you to start writing before the holidays sneak up. How long is a long poem? We're looking for a single poem or cycle of poems that is between 10 to 20 pages long. No restrictions as to subject matter or aesthetic approach apply. Read interviews with Claire Caldwell and Kim Trainor, the 2013 Long Poem Prize winners, to learn more about approaching the long poem.

A prize of $1,000 will be given to two winners. Each winner be interviewed for the website, and selected pieces will be published in the Summer 2015 issue of The Malahat Review.

Three judges will make the final cut: Evan Jones, Anita Lahey, and Alice Major.

Deadline for submissions is February 1, 2015.

Full submission details for the Long Poem Prize available here.


Issues

Clearings, Iceholes, Other Abodes: Derk Wynand Translates Dorothea Grünzweig

Dorothea GrunzweigTo celebrate The Malahat Review's Autumn 2014 Translation Issue, we're posting exclusive content to our website from writers all over the globe. This week's feature, from Dorothea Grünzweig, complements her contribution to Issue 188, "poem of finding and losing" (translated by former Malahat editor Derk Wynand).

Originally published as "Lichtungen, Eislöcher, andere Bleiben," in Zwischen den Zeilen in April 2000, this thought-provoking "ars poetica"—truly "a jailbreak and recreation" (to reference Canada’s Margaret Avison)—is also translated from the German by Wynand.

The way that jets, tempests, or fireworks, captured on paper by an adult child I know, get the fear of them off his back, arrest it—so do the words of poetry act as detention centres, repositories into which fear is thrust, to serve time there.

So if the adult child is distraught, one needs to recite poems to him, make up melodies in which they are wrapped and sing them. He sings along, grows calm, just as he grows calm after wild, erratic joy once the joyrousers slip into small shapes on the page, or laugh out and beckon from a poem.

Continue reading Wynand's translation of Grünzweig's piece.


E-Newsletter

Malahat lite: November 2014 Edition

Neil SmithThis month's e-newsletter is chock-full of translation-related content to celebrate At Home in Translation: Issue 188 of The Malahat Review.

Interviews: Patrick Friesen talks about his translations of Danish writer Ulrikka Gernes' poetry; Joyce Zhang sheds light on Alice Munro in China; and Neil Smith discusses stylistic choices in his translation of Quebec writer Bruno Hébert's fiction.

Features: special shout-out to Constance Rooke CNF winner Rebecca Foust; call for poetry and CNF submissions via Submittable; Our Back Pages Issue 36, October 1975; contest calls for submissions from the Creative Nonfiction Collective Society and Broken Pencil magazine.

Discover this month's edition of Malahat lite.


Issues

Translation Issue 188: Hot Off the Press

Issue #188At Home in Translation: Canadians Translate the World is being mailed to subscribers around the globe!

You'll find works of translation from 28 different writers in this extended issue. Highlighted translators include John Reibetanz, Patrick Friesen, Derk Wynand, A. F. Moritz, Erín Moure, Goldie Morgentaler, and many others. Also of note is poetry translation contest winner Donald McGrath, whose English rendition of Robert Melançon's "Elegy Written in Notre-Dame-de-Grâce Park" is featured inside these pages.

Web exclusives will be posted weekly, including interviews, podcasts, and essays by Malahat authors or associates on internationalism and the process of translation.

Check out the Table of Contents for current web exclusives!


Issues

Our Back Pages:
Issue #36, October 1975

Issue #36Issue #36 emerged at time when the future of The Malahat Review was in peril. Thanks to the collaborative efforts of many people, including letters of support from writers around the world, support was increased, allowing this publication to continue as one Canada’s leading literary journals.

The cover art reflects the spirit of such collaborative effort. Famed American printmaker and typographer Gregory Masurovsky’s portrait of his French friend and artistic collaborator, Michel Butor, graces the cover. A working friendship lasting more than forty years resulted in an impressive body of work including their series “Western Duo.” Ten lithographs from the series appear in this issue.

Following the success of our 50 Issues Project, in which we highlighted select back issues in honour of the University of Victoria’s 50th anniversary, we decided to cast our gaze back, chronologically, over our complete backlist…to include (eventually!) brief reviews of every issue not previously covered. Featured issues will be highlighted on our website biweekly.

Continue reading about this week's featured issue (write-up by Robin Reniero).


Issues

The Malahat Review: A Brief History of its Early Internationalism

Karyn WisselinkIssue 188, At Home in Translation: Canadians Translate the World is due out soon. Can't wait? Check out exclusive online content on our website over the next few weeks, all focused on translation and translation-related topics.

This week's feature highlights the Malahat's history of early internationalism, as explored in an essay by former editorial assistant Karyn Wisselink. Here's a sample of her work:

Literary journals provide some of the best reflections of a literary landscape at certain points in time; they capture the wide range of literature available by publishing various genres written by emerging and well-established writers. In Canada, literary journals were highly regarded and received praise in The Massey Report (1951), which concluded that “in our periodical press we have our closest approximation to a national literature” (Massey 64). These early journals documented the trends and the writers who were influencing Canadian culture. However, circulation was mostly contained within Canada and there were few journals in Canada that supported writers on an international level. In 1966, Robin Skelton and his colleague John Peter began planning The Malahat Review, a journal intended to benefit the Canadian literary landscape with an international and even cosmopolitan approach.

Read the full essay here.


Interviews

Translation Issue Exclusive: An Interview with Joyce Zhang on Translating Alice Munro

Joyce ZhangIssue 188, At Home in Translation: Canadians Translate the World is a culmination of three years of work, with international poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, and book reviews. To highlight the importance of translation (and the pending release of Issue 188), The Malahat Review will post exclusive web content each week, including interviews, essays, and podcasts from contributors and Malahat associates.

The first exclusive content features Malahat editor John Barton in conversation with Joyce Zhang, a Nanjing-based writer whose debut novel Blue Nails created a sensation in China when it was published in 2001. Here, Barton discusses Zhang's creative nonfiction contribution to Issue 188, "Too Much Happiness: On Translating [Alice] Munro into Chinese." Zhang's answers have been translated into English by Daniel Fried.

JB: What aspect of Munro’s writing did you find most challenging to translate while you were rendering Too Much Happiness into Chinese? Have you translated or intend to translate any of Munro’s other books?

JZ: [My] experience with each book wasn’t identical. Too Much Happiness is mature, dispassionate, with its sentiments running deep and much just hinted at, complex threads of narrative, character psychologies that are fairly broad and deep, and quite demanding diction choices. Several puns that worked in English couldn’t be translated into Chinese. How does one reveal her complete intention, the sentiment? Most of my effort was spent on adjusting the word order, because English has a fairly demanding logical structure, with higher precision; Chinese is a non-structural language, so that word order is very important, and is critical for the expression of emotions.

Read the full interview with Joyce Zhang.


Issues

Issue 188, Autumn 2014 Book Reviews Online

The Major Verbs

The Malahat Review's autumn issue, a special 160-page collection dedicated to works of translation, will be mailed this week to subscribers! To pique your interest, we've posted the book reviews to our website - have a read!

Reviews of poetry from Tiziano Broggiato, Chava Rosenfarb, Robert Melançon, Pierre Nepveu and Nuno Júdice; fiction from Christine Eddie and Horacio Castellanos Moya; creative nonfiction from Tomoko Mitani and Sherry Simon (ed.).

Read the reviews from Issue #188's table of contents.


Issues

Our Back Pages:
Issue #34, April 1975

Issue #34Issue 34 is a feast of many flavours, proving that The Malahat shaped cosmopolitan readership almost forty years ago, well before “globalism.” It features such poets as Jose Emilio Pacheco (Mexico); Syed Shamsul Haq (Bangladesh); Shen Chou (China; Jaroslav Seifert (Czeckoslovakia) and Par Lagerkvist (Sweden) as well as prose by Edward Marcotte and Rick de Marinis. But alas: even though feminism was burgeoning in the mid-seventies, male voices predominate: only ten women writers are invited to the table here.

Following the success of our 50 Issues Project, in which we highlighted select back issues in honour of the University of Victoria’s 50th anniversary, we decided to cast our gaze back, chronologically, over our complete backlist…to include (eventually!) brief reviews of every issue not previously covered. Featured issues will be highlighted on our website biweekly.

Continue reading about this week's featured issue (write-up by Lynne Van Luven).


News

Congratulations to Rebecca Foust, Winner of the 2014 Constance Rooke CNF Prize!

Rebecca FoustThe Malahat Review is pleased to announce the winner of its 2014 Creative Nonfiction Prize. American author Rebecca Foust has won $1,000 for her story, "Venn Diagram," chosen by contest judge Priscila Uppal. More than 160 entries were received this year.

"Venn Diagram" will be published in the Winter 2013 issue (#189), and an interview with Foust will appear in December's Malahat lite e-newsletter.

About the winner: Rebecca Foust’s books include All That Gorgeous Pitiless Song, awarded the Many Mountains Moving Book Prize and nominated for the Poet’s Prize; and God, Seed, awarded the 2010 Foreword Book of the Year Award and a Mass Book Award finalist. Foust received an MFA in Poetry from Warren Wilson in 2010 and is the 2014 Dartmouth Poet in Residence at the Frost Place.

Thank you to everyone who entered the contest!

For more details (including judge citation!) view the 2014 CNF announcement page.


Submit

Now Accepting Creative Nonfiction Submissions via Submittable!

SubmittableCalling all creative nonfiction writers! As of October 15, The Malahat Review is accepting digital CNF submissions via Submittable. Mailed-in / paper submissions of creative nonfiction will no longer be read or processed by the Malahat office.

A Submittable account is free and it's easy to join. Unlike other literary journals, we don't charge writers to submit their work using Submittable. Submissions may range from 1,000 to 3,500 words in length. No restrictions as to subject matter or approach apply. It can include, but is not limited to, the personal essay, memoir, narrative nonfiction, social commentary, travel writing, historical accounts, and biography, all enhanced by such elements as description, dramatic scenes, dialogue, and characterization.

Visit our submissions page for full details, and to access our Submittable site.


News

Constance Rooke Creative Nonfiction Contest Shortlist Announced!

CNF PrizeWe're pleased to announce the shortlist for the 2014 Constance Rooke Creative Nonfiction Contest! Four finalists have been posted to our website. Click here for the big reveal.

A record number of contest entries were received this year! Thanks to all supporters and entrants for making this possible. The grand prize winner will be announced by October 17 online.

2014 CNF shortlist available here.

Read about last year's CNF contest winner, Liz Windhorst Harmer.


Issues

Our Back Pages:
Issue #32, October 1974

Issue #32Robin Skelton’s introduction comments on the state of literary magazines and printing costs. Skelton appeals to readers of The Malahat Review to consider the situation, stating that the only way for the magazine to survive is to receive "massive support from its readership." The serious economic state of the magazine in 1974 is offset by the dreamy and textured quality of the writing within.

Following the success of our 50 Issues Project, in which we highlighted select back issues in honour of the University of Victoria’s 50th anniversary, we decided to cast our gaze back, chronologically, over our complete backlist…to include (eventually!) brief reviews of every issue not previously covered. Featured issues will be highlighted on our website biweekly.

Continue reading about this week's featured issue.


E-Newsletter

Malahat lite: October 2014 Edition

Donald McGrathOne month until the Open Season contest deadline! October's e-newsletter has all the ammunition you need to get fired up for entering submissions of poetry, fiction, and/or creative nonfiction.

Interviews: last year's Open Season contest winners Joelle Barron (poetry) and Tajja Isen (fiction) discuss the writing world one year since receiving the award; Donald McGrath, winner of the Malahat's one-time francophone poetry translation contest, talks about the nature of his work; and Matt Rader lets us in on his debut short story collection, What I Want To Tell Goes Like This.

Features: Issue 188, Autumn 2014 table of contents sneak peek; Western Magazine Award Fiction win; phasing out paper submissions of poetry and creative nonfiction; Our Back Pages from October 1974.

Discover this month's edition of Malahat lite.


Submit

Phasing Out Paper Submissions of Poetry and Creative Nonfiction

SubmittableAs of October 1, 2014, The Malahat Review will no longer accept paper / hard copy submissions of poetry that are mailed to our office. And as of October 15, 2014, we will no longer accept paper / hard copy submissions of creative nonfiction mailed in.

Instead, we ask all writers to send us their work using Submittable. It's free, easy to sign up, and saves on paper, postage and time. Poetry submissions are accepted year-round (for now!), and creative nonfiction submissions will be accepted digitally as of October 15.

Visit our submissions page for full details, and to access our Submittable site.


News

Malahat Wins Western Magazine Award in Fiction Category

Western Magazine AwardsCongratulations are in order for Adrick Brock, whose story "Nina in the Body of a Clown" (published in Issue 182, Spring 2013) won the 2014 Western Magazine Award for Fiction! This is Adrick's first publication, and we are excited it found a home with us.

The 2014 award recipients were announced at the Awards Gala, held on Friday, September 26th at the Renaissance Harbourside Vancouver Hotel. Full list of winners available on the WMA website.


Contests

Submit Early to the 2015 Open Season Awards, and Win a 3-Pack Book Prize!

Red Girl Rat BoyThe Malahat Review is giving away books to one lucky Open Season Award contest entrant this year!

The prize pack includes the latest books from our contest judges: poetry judge Jan Conn's Edge Effects (Brick Books), fiction judge Cynthia Flood's Red Girl Rat Boy (Biblioasis), and creative nonfiction judge David Carpenter's Welcome to Canada (Porcupine's Quill).

It's easy: submit to the Open Season contest between October 1 - 15 and we'll put your name in to win this 3-pack book prize courtesy of the publishers!

Regular deadline for submissions is November 1, 2014.

Want to read up on Cynthia Flood's short story collection? We have a review of Red Girl Rat Boy on our website.

Get full details on entering the 2015 Open Season Awards.


Issues

Our Back Pages:
Issue #30, April 1974

Issue #30

Following the success of our 50 Issues Project, in which we highlighted select back issues in honour of the University of Victoria’s 50th anniversary, we decided to cast our gaze back, chronologically, over our complete backlist…to include (eventually!) brief reviews of every issue not previously covered. Featured issues will be highlighted on our website biweekly.

Here's a taste of what Malahat volunteer Robin Reniero had to say:

In his opening comment, Robin Skelton laments what he sees as the proliferation of writers concerned more with “personal hang-ups” than with “the broad scope and nature of social responsibility, natural justice, and human compassion.” He yearns to revisit the engagé literature of the 1930s and, thus, encourages readers to seek out works by writers who convey “honesty of purpose, clarity of mind, and humanity of spirit.” This 1974 issue provides a wealth of opportunity to do just that. 

Continue reading about this week's featured issue.


Issues

Translation Issue Table of Contents Online

Issue #188At Home in Translation: Canadians Translate the World is due out October 2014, but you can get a sneak peek at what's inside on the Table of Contents page. A culmination of three years of work, this issue is one of our biggest yet, with international poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, book reviews, and a special interview between Katia Grubisic and Hugh Hazelton on the process of translation.

Highlighted translators include John Reibetanz, Patrick Friesen, Derk Wynand, A. F. Moritz, Erín Moure, Goldie Morgentaler, and many others. 15 languages, 28 writers, 5 continents! (Excited yet?)

Discover more authors, translators and book reviewers on the Table of Contents.


Contests

Open Season Awards: Call for Submissions

Open Season 2015The Malahat's annual Open Season Awards is inviting entries of poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction from around the world!

A prize of $1,000 will be given to one winner in each category. Winners will be interviewed for the website, and selected pieces will be published in the Spring 2015 issue of The Malahat Review.

Deadline for submissions is November 1, 2014.

Get full details on entering the 2015 Open Season Awards.

Read a biography of the judges: Jan Conn, Cynthia Flood, David Carpenter.

Looking for inspiration? Read the announcement pages for last year's winners, with links to interviews and judge citations on winning pieces.


E-Newsletter

Malahat lite: September 2014 Edition

Chris GudgeonWe have big opportunities and bigger names in this month's Malahat lite!

Interviews: Open Season Contest judges Jan Conn, Cynthia Flood, and David Carpenter (poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction respectively) discuss the writing life, influences, and what they'll be looking for in contest submissions this year. Laura Ritland, the winner of this year's Far Horizons Poetry Award, talks with poetry board member Jay Ruzesky about her win.

Features: MalaPod podcast with Issue 187 fiction contributor Chris Gudgeon, call for poetry submissions via Submittable, Our Back Pages issue from the 70's, Translation Contest congratulations notice to Donald McGrath, and more!

Discover all this and more in the newsletter.


Issues

Our Back Pages:
Issue #29, January 1974

Issue #29

Following the success of our 50 Issues Project, in which we highlighted select back issues in honour of the University of Victoria’s 50th anniversary, we decided to cast our gaze back, chronologically, over our complete backlist…to include (eventually!) brief reviews of every issue not previously covered. Featured issues will be highlighted on our website biweekly.

Here's a taste of what Malahat volunteer Robin Reniero had to say:

Issue #29 opens with Robin Skelton’s intriguing commentary suggesting that the world of stamp collecting has parallels to the study of world literature in that it “enables people to explore and understand something of the culture and history of other countries.” It is perhaps fitting, then, that the issue begins with three poems by the distinguished Pablo Neruda, recipient of both the International Peace Prize (1950) and Nobel Prize for Literature (1971).

Continue reading about this week's featured issue.

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CONTEST
DEADLINES

Feb 1, 2015

Long Poem Prize

May 1, 2015

Far Horizons Fiction Award

Aug 1, 2015

Constance Rooke Creative Nonfiction Prize

Nov 1, 2015

Open Season Awards

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