Marisa Brook

Research Associate
Department of Linguistics
University of Victoria

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Most of my research lies within the framework of variationist sociolinguistics and is therefore centred around spotting and interpreting patterns of language variation and change.

I'm particularly interested in variables on the morphosyntactic and discourse-pragmatic levels, and their trajectories over (real or apparent) time: grammatical change, layering, recycling, etc. I have a penchant for subordinate clause markers of all sorts, and I'm always curious about linguistic shifts that are interdependent or otherwise linked.

Publications


to appear

Marisa Brook. A two-tiered change in Canadian English: The emergence of a streamlined evidential system. University of Pennsylvania Working Papers in Linguistics, 23(2).

2017     [pdf]

Marisa Brook. Interactive name databases as an introduction to social factors and graph interpretation. American Speech, 92(2), 264-278.

2016     [pdf]

Marisa Brook and Sali A. Tagliamonte. Why does North American English use try to but British English use try and? Let's try and/to figure it out. American Speech, 91(3), 301-326.

2014     [pdf]

Marisa Brook. Comparative complementizers in Canadian English: Insights from early fiction. University of Pennsylvania Working Papers in Linguistics, 20(2), 1-10.

2011     [pdf]

Marisa Brook. One of those situations where a relative pronoun becomes a complementizer: A case of grammaticalization in progress...again. Proceedings of the 2011 Annual Meeting of the Canadian Linguistic Association.


Conference presentations and posters


upcoming

Marisa Brook. Where the where things are: SKT constructions and the grammaticalization of pseudolocative where [poster]. LSA Annual Meeting 2018 (Salt Lake City, Utah, USA – 4-7 January 2018).

Marisa Brook. I feel like and it feels like: Two paths to the emergence of epistemic markers. NWAV 46 (Madison, Wisconsin, USA – 2-5 November 2017).

2017

Marisa Brook, Bridget Jankowski, Lex Konnelly, and Sali A. Tagliamonte. Post-adolescent change in the individual: Early adulthood against the backdrop of the community. LSA Annual Meeting 2017 (Austin, Texas, USA – 5-8 January 2017).

2016

Marisa Brook. A two-tiered change in Canadian English: The emergence of a streamlined evidential system. NWAV 45 (Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada – 3-6 November 2016).

Marisa Brook. This seems to be on the way out: Covariants of seem subordination in Canadian and British English. Change and Variation in Canada 9 (Ottawa, Ontario, Canada – 7-8 May 2016).

Sali A. Tagliamonte and Marisa Brook. Adaptive change in sociolinguistic typology: The case of relative who [poster]. LSA Annual Meeting 2016 (Washington, D.C., USA – 7-10 January 2016).

Matt Hunt Gardner, Derek Denis, Marisa Brook, and Sali A. Tagliamonte. From the bottom to the top of the S-curve: Be like and the Constant Rate Effect. LSA Annual Meeting 2016 (Washington, D.C., USA – 7-10 January 2016).

2015     [pdf]

Marisa Brook and Emily Blamire. Ness-less-ness: Zero-derived adjectival nominals in Internet forum data. NWAV 44 (Toronto, Ontario, Canada – 22-25 October 2015).

Sali A. Tagliamonte and Marisa Brook. Let's try and/to figure this out! Using spoken vernacular corpora to inform explanation. ICAME 36 (Trier, Germany – 27-31 May 2015).

             [pdf]

Marisa Brook. Syntactic categories informing variationist analysis: The case of English copy-raising. LSA Annual Meeting 2015 (Portland, Oregon, USA – 8-11 January 2015).

2014

Marisa Brook. A peripheral view of a change from above: Prestige forms over time in a medium-sized community. NWAV 43 (Chicago, Illinois, USA – 23-26 October 2014).

Marisa Brook. A peripheral view of a change from above: Prestige forms over time in a medium-sized community. Change and Variation in Canada 8 (Kingston, Ontario, Canada – 31 May and 1 June 2014).

2013

Marisa Brook. Comparative complementizers in Canadian English: Insights from early fiction. NWAV 42 (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA – 17-20 October 2013).

Matt Hunt Gardner, Derek Denis, Marisa Brook, and Sali A. Tagliamonte. The new global flow of linguistic influence: Be like at the saturation point. NWAV 42 (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA – 17-20 October 2013).

Marisa Brook. Intersecting phonotactic restrictions and their perceptual effects. 2013 Annual Meeting of the Canadian Linguistics Association (Victoria, British Columbia, Canada – 1-3 June 2013).

Matt Hunt Gardner, Derek Denis, Marisa Brook, and Sali A. Tagliamonte. "I'm like, 'Itís different in York'": Real-time and apparent-time quotative trends in Toronto, Canada – and York, England. Change and Variation in Canada 7 (Toronto, Ontario, Canada – 4-5 May 2013).

2012

Marisa Brook and Naomi Nagy. Speech-rate in two Toronto heritage languages. The Road Less Travelled (Toronto, Ontario, Canada – 26-27 October 2012).

2011

Marisa Brook. One of those situations where a relative pronoun becomes a complementizer: A case of grammaticalization in progress...again. 2011 Annual Meeting of the Canadian Linguistics Association (Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada – 28-31 May 2011).

Marisa Brook. Looks like there's something interesting going on here. Change and Variation in Canada 5 (Victoria, British Columbia, Canada – 14-15 May 2011).

2009

Marisa Brook. One of those situations where a relative pronoun becomes a complementizer. Cornell Undergraduate Linguistics Colloquium 3 (Ithaca, New York, USA – 4-5 April 2009).


Invited talks, guest lectures, and workshops


upcoming

Marisa Brook (upcoming). Cascaded changes: The case of complementizer like in Canadian English. Linguistics Circle Colloquium Series, University of Victoria (Victoria, B.C., Canada – 28 September 2017).

2017

Marisa Brook. Language and social class. Linguistics 495: Language Variation and Change, University of Victoria (Victoria, British Columbia, Canada – 18 September 2017).

Marisa Brook. The ins and outs of corpus analysis. Workshop for Great Lakes Expo for Experimental and Formal Undergraduate Linguistics (GLEEFUL) (East Lansing, Michigan, USA – 22-23 April 2017).

2016

Marisa Brook. Seems like subordination: Morphosyntactic change on two levels and its implications for evidential expressions. Michigan State University Linguistics Colloquium (East Lansing, Michigan, USA – 6 October 2016).

Marisa Brook. This seems to be on the way out: Covariants of seem subordination in Canadian and British English. Department of Linguistics and English Language, University of Manchester (Manchester, England, United Kingdom – 23 May 2016).

Marisa Brook. Clara's comparative complementizers: A case-study perspective amidst a two-level change in the community. Linguistics 1256: Advanced Language Variation, University of Toronto (Toronto, Ontario, Canada – 22 February 2016).

2015

Marisa Brook. Not so co-relative: The past and present of restrictive who and that in Toronto and Belleville, Ontario. Symposium of Graduate Research on Canadian English, Queen's University (Kingston, Ontario, Canada – 18 November 2015).

Marisa Brook. Relatively distinct: Localized loss of prestige on the periphery of urban Canadian English. Linguistics 202: Canadian English, Queen's University (Kingston, Ontario, Canada – 12 March 2015).

2013

Matt Hunt Gardner, Derek Denis, Marisa Brook, and Sali A. Tagliamonte. Be like at the saturation point: What large-scale student research projects can discover. University of Toronto Society of Linguistics Undergraduates (SLUGS) (Toronto, Ontario, Canada – 21 November 2013).


Media appearances


2015

Rich Smith. I feel like we say 'I feel like' all the time: The origins and virtues of one of English's most popular qualifiers. The Stranger, 15 July 2015. [link]


Manuscripts


under review

Marisa Brook. Taking it up a level: Copy raising and cascaded tiers of morphosyntactic change.

Marisa Brook, Bridget Jankowski, Lex Konnelly, and Sali A. Tagliamonte. "I don't come off as timid anymore": Real-time change in early adulthood against the backdrop of the community.

submitted

Naomi Nagy and Marisa Brook. Cross-linguistic constraints on speech rate: What do they tell us about heritage language variability?

revising

Derek Denis, Matt Hunt Gardner, Marisa Brook, and Sali A. Tagliamonte. Peaks and arrowheads of vernacular reorganization.

in preparation

Sali A. Tagliamonte and Marisa Brook. Relativizers up north: The Cascade Model in action.

Matt Hunt Gardner, Derek Denis, Marisa Brook, and Sali A. Tagliamonte. Be like and the Constant Rate Effect: From the bottom to the top of the S-curve.