Plutarch and Shakespeare Compared

The Life of Marcus Antonius Antony and Cleopatra
As soon as it was light, he marched his infantry out of the city, and posted them upon a rising ground, from whence he saw his fleet make up to the enemy. There he stood in expectation of the event; but as soon as the fleets came near to one another, his men saluted Caesar's with their oars; and on their responding, the whole body of the ships, forming into a single fleet, rowed up direct to the city. Antony had no sooner seen this, but the horse deserted him, and went over to Caesar; and his foot being defeated, he retired into the city, crying out that Cleopatra had betrayed him to the enemies he had made for her sake. [MARK ANTONY]
My fleet hath yielded to the foe; and yonder
They cast their caps up and carouse together
Like friends long lost.

IV.xii.11-13


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