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Belojevic, Sayers, INKE, and MVP teams publish new paper

Peer Review Personas

Abstract

Arguing for the relevance of speculative prototyping to the development of any technology, this essay presents a “Peer Review Personas” prototype intended primarily for authoring and publication platforms. It walks audiences through various aspects of the prototype while also conjecturing about its cultural and social implications. Rather than situating digital scholarly communication and digital technologies in opposition to legacy procedures for review and publication, the prototype attempts to meaningfully integrate those procedures into networked environments, affording practitioners a range of choices and applications. The essay concludes with a series of considerations for further developing the prototype.

For the rest, click here.

 

Peer Review Personas

Nina Belojevic, Jentery Sayers, and the INKE and MVP Research Teams
university of victoria
Volume 17Issue 3Metrics for Measuring Publishing Value: Alternative and OtherwiseSummer 2014

Z-Axis Scholarship: Modeling How Modernists Wrote the City

The following long paper was delivered at the Digital Humanities 2014 conference. Co-authored by Alex Christie, Stephen Ross, Jentery Sayers, Katie Tanigawa, and the INKE-MVP research team.

One of the most basic analytical tools we employ in literary criticism is to consider the setting of a literary work: where does the action take place? Naturally, if the action takes place in a city with the same name and some of the same recognizable features as cities existing in the world, we assume that the fiction is set in the real city. At the same time, no city in a novel is precisely the historical or actual city you could up and visit. We all know that cities in novels are fictitious. They are constructs sometimes used to illustrate characters’ states of mind, sometimes used to point out ideological or political interventions, sometimes used to invoke historical narratives. And yet the impulse persists to think the city of Paris is the same as the Paris in Djuna Barnes’s Nightwood, or Jean Rhys’s Quartet, or Ernest Hemingway’s A Moveable Feast, or F. Scott Fitzgerald’s Tender is the Night. This list could continue on. Read more

Vizualizing Communities in Mrs. Dalloway

“It was precisely twelve o’clock; twelve by Big Ben; whose stroke was wafted over the northern part of London; blent with that of other clocks, mixed in a thin ethereal way with the clouds and wisps of smoke, and died up there among the seagulls–twelve o’clock struck as Clarissa Dalloway laid her green dress on her bed, and the Warren Smiths walked down Harley Street. Twelve was the hour of their appointment. Probably, Rezia thought, that was Sir William Bradshaw’s house with the grey motor car in front of it. The leaden circles dissolved in the air.”

According to network analysis, paragraph 349 in Mrs. Dalloway is the most central; that is, in the whole of the novel, this is the paragraph that connects the greatest number of significant character nodes. That it takes place in the middle of the day seems to indicate the extent of Woolf’s, perhaps unconscious, narrative ability. Read more

MVP @ MSA

The MVP is coming to the MSA in a big way this year! MVPers are presenting on panels and round tables, in seminars, in the poster session, and even organizing panels and seminars. Please see below for abstracts and outlines of what we’ll be bringing to the show – and if you’ll be in Pittsburgh for the conference, please check out some of the work on offer.

 

Modernist Studies Association Conference 2014 (Pittsburgh, PA) Nov. 6-9.

 

Participating MVPers: Adèle Barclay, Alex Christie, James Gifford, Adam Hammond, J. Matthew Huculak, Stephen Ross, Katie Tanigawa. Read more