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Belojevic, Sayers, INKE, and MVP teams publish new paper

Peer Review Personas

Abstract

Arguing for the relevance of speculative prototyping to the development of any technology, this essay presents a “Peer Review Personas” prototype intended primarily for authoring and publication platforms. It walks audiences through various aspects of the prototype while also conjecturing about its cultural and social implications. Rather than situating digital scholarly communication and digital technologies in opposition to legacy procedures for review and publication, the prototype attempts to meaningfully integrate those procedures into networked environments, affording practitioners a range of choices and applications. The essay concludes with a series of considerations for further developing the prototype.

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Peer Review Personas

Nina Belojevic, Jentery Sayers, and the INKE and MVP Research Teams
university of victoria
Volume 17Issue 3Metrics for Measuring Publishing Value: Alternative and OtherwiseSummer 2014

Vizualizing Communities in Mrs. Dalloway

“It was precisely twelve o’clock; twelve by Big Ben; whose stroke was wafted over the northern part of London; blent with that of other clocks, mixed in a thin ethereal way with the clouds and wisps of smoke, and died up there among the seagulls–twelve o’clock struck as Clarissa Dalloway laid her green dress on her bed, and the Warren Smiths walked down Harley Street. Twelve was the hour of their appointment. Probably, Rezia thought, that was Sir William Bradshaw’s house with the grey motor car in front of it. The leaden circles dissolved in the air.”

According to network analysis, paragraph 349 in Mrs. Dalloway is the most central; that is, in the whole of the novel, this is the paragraph that connects the greatest number of significant character nodes. That it takes place in the middle of the day seems to indicate the extent of Woolf’s, perhaps unconscious, narrative ability. Read more

Bloomsday 2014: Building Communities

(Photos below)

The Modernist Versions Project might just be the only digital humanities project to launch in a pub and partner with a brewery in the celebration of Bloomsday!

On June 16,  2012, the Modernist Versions Project officially started with the announcement of our “Year of Ulysses” initiative celebrated at the James Joyce Bistro in downtown Victoria.

In 2013, MVP Co-Directors Stephen Ross and Matt Huculak taught a versioning course at the Digital Humanities Summer Institute, which ended with a Bloomsday lecture by Hans Walter Gabler (followed by readings at the James Joyce Bistro!).

This year, thanks to a unique partnership with the University Library, The Department of English, and The Electronic Textual Cultures Lab, MVP Co-Director, Dr. J. Matthew Huculak and Kathy Bohlman, MAS, launched “From Paris to Victoria: Giséle Freund’s James Joyce Photographs” in the Mearns Centre for Learning, Special Collections in the University of Victoria Library (June 16-July 10, 2014). This photographic exhibition highlights the Gisèle Freund Fonds held by the University of Victoria Library and includes the most intimate photographs ever taken of Joyce and his family. The exhibit also includes the Joyce-inspired art of Robert Amos, RCA. Read more