Victorian Poetry Network "much to do with Victorian poetry"

Archive for January, 2011
Whether and Whither “Victorian Poetry”? The Dialectics of Field Expansion

I have first of all to thank VPN (and especially Alison Chapman and Chris Foss) for putting Toru Dutt on my radar and Linda Hughes for leading me to see Clough’s 1848 “Bothie of Toper-Na-Fuosich” through a transatlantic lens, since I had always before associated Clough more with Italy through “Amours de Voyage” than with […]

Toru Dutt and Transnationalism

Thank you to Alison Chapman & co. for a wonderful new resource!  I am especially excited by the thought-provoking engagements with transnationalism in Alison’s post and in Linda Hughes’s post.  I wish I had time to contribute a substantial original post along these lines, but for now, I will have to content myself with posting a […]

The Long Nineteenth Century: Where Have the Women Poets Gone?

It started in 1994. Catherine Reilly produced an anthology of Victorian women’s poetry, a loving, scholarly, wide-ranging, sometimes eccentric, but always arresting collection of over sixty poets. She went well beyond the routine inclusion of Christina Rossetti and Elizabeth Barrett Browning. She was the first editor to anthologize Amy Levy, and the first to grasp […]

The Bothie of Toper-Na-Fuosich as Transatlantic Poem

Taking my cue from Alison Chapman’s fascinating blog about Toru Dutt as well as other transnational 19th-century poetry associated with Britain (I studiously avoid “Victorian” for the nonce), I want to approach Arthur Hugh Clough’s 1848 Bothie of Toper-Na-Fuosich in analogous terms.  The Bothie is transnational in its very setting and plot.  It turns on […]

‘Little Things’: Poetry, the Periodical Press, and Good Words

Over the past 9 months, I have read a lot periodical poetry, focusing on the illustrated (and unillustrated) poetry published in the Cornhill Magazine, Once a Week, and now Good Words.  My research has surprised me as I am beginning to understand periodical poetry as central to the development and cohesion of a periodical’s literary […]

Why Toru Dutt matters: networking Victorian Poetry

Who do we read when we read Victorian poetry in our classrooms, for our research and even (yes, even) in our leisure time? Perhaps you might think that the debate has been settled somewhat by the magisterial Victorian poetry print anthologies published by Broadview, Blackwell and Oxford University Press, among others. But what happens with […]