Victorian Poetry Network "much to do with Victorian poetry"

Author Archive
Swinburne Project update

[The following is posted on behalf of John Walsh] I am pleased to announce a new edition of the online Algernon Charles Swinburne Project <http://www.swinburneproject.org/>, with a new design, architecture, and most importantly, a great deal of new content. This new edition includes over 440 documents (poems, essays, reviews, visualizations, etc.). Some highlights of the […]

Call for Protest: Inaccurate, Unfair Assessment of Robert Browning

VPN readers will recall Robert Browning’s bi-centenary this year, and the recent flurry of events organized to mark this important occasion advertised on this website: see here for the round-up post (including news of two major international conferences), here for a blog post calling for more attention to poetry in this bi-centenary year for Browning and […]

Poem of the Month: William Michael Rossetti’s “Shelley’s Heart”
Poem of the Month: William Michael Rossetti's "Shelley's Heart"

  The poem for this month comes from The Dark Blue, a title we’re indexing at the Database of Victorian Periodical Poetry that was a short-lived wonder (5 volumes from 1871 to 1873) but, nevertheless, significant. The Dark Blue drew its name from an earlier periodical, the even briefer Dark Blue: An Oxford University Magazine, […]

More Robert Browning Bicentenary Celebrations

Following the cfp of the Browning conference at the ABL this autumn, here is a round-up of events that are being organized through The Browning Society: 10 March: AGM of The Browning Society, preceded by a visit to Carlyle’s House in Chelsea, London, and followed by a lecture by David Sorenson on Carlyle and Browning […]

Poem of the Month: Edward Lear’s “The Owl and the Pussy-Cat”
Poem of the Month: Edward Lear's "The Owl and the Pussy-Cat"

Edward Lear, “The Owl and the Pussy-Cat”                     I.               1  The Owl and the Pussy-Cat went to sea               2    In a beautiful pea-green boat:               3  They […]

CFP: Robert Browning and Victorian Poetry at 200

Posted on behalf of Kirstie Blair ‘Robert Browning and Victorian Poetry at 200’, Nov 1-3, 2012. Armstrong Browning Library, Baylor University. To celebrate Robert Browning’s bicentenary in 2012, the Armstrong Browning Library is hosting an international conference that will focus on Browning’s importance within the broader field of Victorian poetry and poetics, and within Victorian […]

Poetry, Ladies and Slang; or, when is Bushy just a dog?
Poetry, Ladies and Slang; or, when is Bushy just a dog?

As part of my completion of a book on the expatriate network of British and American women poets in Italy in the mid-nineteenth century, I’ve been looking again at the poetry of Isa Blagden. A poem I’d bypassed originally now intrigues me some more. But I’m not sure what to make of it. The poem […]

Poem of the Month: Christina Rossetti’s “Who has seen the wind?”
Poem of the Month: Christina Rossetti's "Who has seen the wind?"

  Who has seen the wind? Neither I nor you: But when the leaves hang trembling The wind is passing thro’. Who has seen the wind? Neither you nor I: But when the trees bow down their heads The wind is passing by. My five-year-old son asked me yesterday what made the wind. This was […]

Dickens’ Bicentenary: Why the Fuss?
Dickens' Bicentenary: Why the Fuss?

We are entering the era of Victorian bi-centenaries. Robert Browning’s 200th birthday is on 7 May. Edward Lear follows close behind on 12 May. And then there’s Charles Dickens, who reaches his bi-centenary on 7 February. But I expect you already know that, because celebrations on his behalf have been going on for a while […]

Victorian Apps Review (1)
Victorian Apps Review (1)

In duty’s ordered care I use, With thrifty care, the bale of time; And who shall censure, if I choose To piece the fragments into rhyme? (Epigraph to Lily Overington’s Random Rhymes and Christmas Chimes) Recently a trend has developed in the app (application) store for iPad and iPhone: libraries, museums and developers have been […]

Victorian Poetry Podcasts

We’ve found some Victorian poetry podcasts that readers of VPN may find interesting and useful for teaching. Did we leave any out? How have you used podcasts for teaching? Please let us know! Poetry Podcasts by Kirsty Blair and Rhian Williams (University of Glasgow): includes podcasts on Robert Browning’s “Porphyria’s Lover” and “A Woman’s Last […]

Poem of the Month: Tennyson’s “Tears, Idle Tears”
Poem of the Month: Tennyson's "Tears, Idle Tears"

Tennyson’s lyric “Tears, Idle Tears” is often seen as the representative Victorian poem of melancholy, and particularly a melancholy without explicit object. The poem has been useful in my upper-level Victorian poetry classes to demonstrate Arthur Hallam’s key poetics essay on “poems of sensation” as opposed to “poems of reflection” (in his 1831 review of […]

What We’re Working On

We’re fortunate at VPN to have on the team three talented, hard working and enthusiastic students at different stages of their university careers. This post is their answer to the question: “What are you working on now”? A project like VPN and the Victorian Periodical Poetry Database only exists because of the dedication of these […]

CFP: The Ends of History

CFP: THE ENDS OF HISTORY, a Special Issue of Victorian Studies. In the 1980s and 1990s, literary critics and historians occupied a relatively integrated conceptual space through the rise of cultural studies and the “new historicism.” If this interdisciplinary framework was never seamless, “historicization” nonetheless represented a critical project equally palpable to history and literary criticism. The […]

CFP: Special issue of Victorian Poetry on periodical poetry

  Victorian Poetry Special Issue: Victorian Periodical Poetry Spring 2014   Edited by Alison Chapman and Caley Ehnes University of Victoria, Canada     Until recently, poetry published in Victorian periodicals was simply ignored. Dismissed as “filler”, devalued as sentimental, and denigrated as popular verse, periodical poetry languished behind serial fiction and the more respectable […]

Beyond Accessibility: Textual Studies in the 21st Century

Beyond Accessibility: Textual Studies in the 21st Century   Call for Papers   The Textual Studies team of INKE (Implementing New Knowledge Environments) wish to invite presentation proposals for Beyond Accessibility: Textual Studies in the 21st Century, June 8, 9, and 10, 2012, University of Victoria, Victoria BC, Canada. Keynote speakers: Adriaan van der Weel (Leiden University) […]

Poem of the Month: Christina Rossetti’s “In an Artist’s Studio”
Poem of the Month: Christina Rossetti's "In an Artist's Studio"

                                      Dante Gabriel Rossetti drew numerous pictures of his model, muse and later wife Elizabeth Siddal. The Rossetti Archive exhibits many portraits from 1850-1861, such as those given here. When his sister Christina’s poem “In an Artist’s […]

New books on Anglo-Indian Poetry

New Books Announcement from  Ohio University Press VICTORIAN STUDIES • SOUTH ASIAN LITERATURE From Mary Ellis Gibson: Indian Angles English Verse in Colonial India from Jones to Tagore “Meticulously resuscitating a mostly illegible and invisible archive, Gibson’s comprehensive study of English-language poetry written in and about India should dramatically transform the postcolonial canon. Emphasizing the […]

Poem of the Month: Tennyson’s “The Lady of Shalott”

As students begin their new Fall classes in Victorian poetry, I thought I’d choose Tennyson’s “The Lady of Shalott” as my poem of the month for September, with the question: does the poem work as the first “Victorian” poem, as courses traditionally place it? What would happen if we start our Victorian poetry syllabus in […]

Poem of the Month: Amy Levy’s “Ballade of an Omnibus”
Poem of the Month: Amy Levy's "Ballade of an Omnibus"

Amy Levy is experiencing a revival. And it’s about time. An important late-century Anglo-Jewish poet, Levy wrote technically accomplished, radical poetry, as well as several novels and periodical essays, and was a member of important politically active literary circles in London (including Karl Pearson’s “A Men and Women’s Club”). She was the first Jewish woman […]

Hot off the press: “Rhyme, Rhythm, and the Materiality of Poetry” in Victorian Studies

Victorian Studies for Spring 2011 is just out, and it contains a fascinating section on poetry: Adela Pinch, “Rhyme’s End” (on Mary Elizabeth Coleridge) Beth Newman, “Alice Meynell, Walter Pater, and Aestheticist Temporality” Naomi Levine, “Trebled Beauty: William Morris’s Terza Rima” Stephen Arata, “Rhyme, Rhythm, and the Materiality of Poetry: Response”

CFP: Victorian Media

[This CFP is circulated on behalf of Lisa Surridge] The Victorian Studies Association of Western Canada invites proposals for a conference on Victorian Media. The conference, hosted by the University of Victoria, will be held from 26-28 April 2012 in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. We seek proposals for papers that focus on the theme of […]

Bad poetry or good verse? Felicia Hemans’ “Casabianca”
Bad poetry or good verse? Felicia Hemans' "Casabianca"

The British newspaper The Guardian features, for its current “poem of the week”, Felicia Hemans’ widely anthologised poem “Casabianca”. Its discussion, aimed at the general (educated, literate) reader, focuses on the merits of the poem as poetry, and whether it still deserves to be read. The critic, poet and creative writing professor Carol Rumens, wonders […]

Poets in Paris: Galignani’s Bookshop and Reading Room
Poets in Paris: Galignani's Bookshop and Reading Room

Mention Paris and bookshops and most people will perhaps think first of Shakespeare and Company, famously owned by Sylvia Beach and frequented by Joyce, Hemmingway and Pound. In Hemmingway’s late memoir of his life in Paris, A Movable Feast (1964), Sylvia Beach is about the only person who avoids his ridicule and wrath, as he documents […]