Victorian Poetry Network "much to do with Victorian poetry"

Research
Forthcoming: The Encyclopedia of Victorian Literature

Inaugural Poems in Victorian Periodicals

New or re-launched Victorian periodicals often published as their very first item, in their very first issue, a poem to define the “personality”, ideological orientation, and readership community of the title. These inaugural poems emphasized the cultural value of poetry to the periodical, a value that enhanced the periodical’s claim to literary prestige and also the serial’s […]

Why poetry in Chambers’s Journal matters
Why poetry in Chambers's Journal matters

The Database of Victorian Periodical Poetry is currently completing the indexing and scanning of the weekly Chambers’s Edinburgh Journal (which, after 1854, a change to monthly publication, and re-location to London, was re-titled Chambers’s Journal of Popular Literature, Science, and Arts, and which changed again in 1898 to Chambers’s Journal). By the end of March 2014 […]

A Scottish Gerard Manley Hopkins?
A Scottish Gerard Manley Hopkins?

Why would a twentieth-century Scottish poet want to translate Gerard Manley Hopkins into Scots? In 1968, Edith Anne Robertson published her translations into Scots of Gerard Manley Hopkins. This audacious collection maintained the sprung rhythm and verse form of Hopkins, and kept many of his rhymes or rhyme sounds, but transposed the diction into Lallans. […]

Mary MacLeod and the Poetry of Religious Surrender

During my work as a research assistant for the Victorian Poetry Network, I came across the poetry of Mary MacLeod in Atalanta, a monthly magazine for middle-class young women published in London from October 1887 until September 1898.  Though Mary MacLeod wrote prolifically in the magazine between 1887 and 1893, she and her poetry have […]

Scottish Women Poets
Scottish Women Poets

How many teachers of Victorian poetry ensure they represent Scottish poetry in their syllabus? Probably women feature heavily on course reading lists, but what about Scottish women poets? And how to define Victorian Scottish women writers in any case? My friend and former colleague Dorothy McMillan edited (with Michael Byrne) the definitive edition of Modern […]

Victorian Poetry Studies 20 years on?

What are the most important events in Victorian poetry studies in the last 20 years? Next year marks the 20th anniversary of Isobel Armstrong’s monumental study Victorian Poetry: Poetry, Poetics, Politics, and it’s hard to underestimate the impact the book has had on the field. When I noticed that the study — which I read […]

The Victorianator, an iPhone Game: Thoughts on Design-Oriented Digital Humanities
The Victorianator, an iPhone Game: Thoughts on Design-Oriented Digital Humanities

It has been a little over a year since my Concordia-based research team LudicVoice released its first digital game, The Victorianator.  This odd experiment in reading and game design received some unexpected attention in venues such as the New Yorker and Wired when it was released to the Apple store in August, and then updated in October,  2011.  While […]

CFP: Victorian Poetry: Form and Fashion
CFP: Victorian Poetry: Form and Fashion

Posted on behalf of John Lamb Victorian Poetry: Forms and Fashions A Conference in Celebration of the 50th Anniversary of Victorian Poetry 19-20 April 2013 West Virginia University Please send 300-500 word proposals for papers and a 1-page c.v. via email to John.Lamb@mail.wvu.edu by 15 November 2012. Papers on any aspect of Victorian Poetry and Poetics are invited, […]

The local press as poetry publisher, 1800-1900
The local press as poetry publisher, 1800-1900

English local newspapers published around two million poems during the nineteenth century – more, if we include Scottish, Irish and Welsh papers. Although poetry in periodicals is now being acknowledged in recent research and scholarly databases, newspaper poetry has received less attention. Studies of working-class poets acknowledge in passing that much of their writing was […]

Poem of the Month: Edward Lear’s “The Owl and the Pussy-Cat”
Poem of the Month: Edward Lear's "The Owl and the Pussy-Cat"

Edward Lear, “The Owl and the Pussy-Cat”                     I.               1  The Owl and the Pussy-Cat went to sea               2    In a beautiful pea-green boat:               3  They […]

CFP: Robert Browning and Victorian Poetry at 200

Posted on behalf of Kirstie Blair ‘Robert Browning and Victorian Poetry at 200’, Nov 1-3, 2012. Armstrong Browning Library, Baylor University. To celebrate Robert Browning’s bicentenary in 2012, the Armstrong Browning Library is hosting an international conference that will focus on Browning’s importance within the broader field of Victorian poetry and poetics, and within Victorian […]

The Cultural Place of George Eliot’s Poetry: Special Issue of George Eliot-George Henry Lewes Studies

The Victorian Poetry Network will be happy to hear about the September 2011 issue (60-61) of George Eliot-George Henry Lewes Studies dedicated to George Eliot’s poetry. Edited by Kyriaki Hadjiafxendi, the special issue consists of articles by both young and well-established scholars including Isobel Armstrong, Alexis Easley, Charles LaPorte, Kathleen McCormack, Katherine Newey, Linda H. […]

Dickens’ Bicentenary: Why the Fuss?
Dickens' Bicentenary: Why the Fuss?

We are entering the era of Victorian bi-centenaries. Robert Browning’s 200th birthday is on 7 May. Edward Lear follows close behind on 12 May. And then there’s Charles Dickens, who reaches his bi-centenary on 7 February. But I expect you already know that, because celebrations on his behalf have been going on for a while […]

“I meant to find Her when I came”: Emily Dickinson in Manhattan

I meant to find Her when I came— Death—had the same design— But the Success—was His—it seems— And the Surrender—Mine— (Emily Dickinson, #718) The exhibition of Emily Dickinson materials currently on view at the Poets House appears modest at first glance. It’s comprised of several letters, an inscribed copy of Adam Bede, a handful of […]

Poem of the Month: “The Christmas Child” by Isa Craig
Poem of the Month: "The Christmas Child" by Isa Craig

Isa Craig’s “The Christmas Child” appears in the January 1862 issue of Good Words. The seasonal topic of the poem is suggestive of the diurnal readings practices promoted by Good Words. The explicitly devotional poetry found in the periodical evolved (in part) from John Keble’s extremely popular poetry volume The Christian Year (1827). Keble based his cycle […]

Beyond Accessibility: Textual Studies in the 21st Century

Beyond Accessibility: Textual Studies in the 21st Century   Call for Papers   The Textual Studies team of INKE (Implementing New Knowledge Environments) wish to invite presentation proposals for Beyond Accessibility: Textual Studies in the 21st Century, June 8, 9, and 10, 2012, University of Victoria, Victoria BC, Canada. Keynote speakers: Adriaan van der Weel (Leiden University) […]

New book on Robert Browning
New book on Robert Browning

Browning, Victorian Poetics and the Romantic Legacy: Challenging the Personal Voice by Britta Martens Taking an original approach to Robert Browning’s poetics, Britta Martens analyses his work in relation to Romanticism and an evolving Victorian poetic culture. She goes beyond reductive interpretations of Browning as a self-effacing poet to reveal a highly self-conscious, self-dramatising and […]

Conference on the Dramatic Monologue

Reassessing the Dramatic Monologue in the 19th and 20th Centuries: Browning, Before, Beyond Royal Holloway, University of London 28-30 June 2012 Organized by the London Browning Society in collaboration with Royal Holloway, University of London, the University of Westminster and the University of the West of England. Supported by the British Association of Victorian Studies […]

New books on Anglo-Indian Poetry

New Books Announcement from  Ohio University Press VICTORIAN STUDIES • SOUTH ASIAN LITERATURE From Mary Ellis Gibson: Indian Angles English Verse in Colonial India from Jones to Tagore “Meticulously resuscitating a mostly illegible and invisible archive, Gibson’s comprehensive study of English-language poetry written in and about India should dramatically transform the postcolonial canon. Emphasizing the […]

Poetry in the Chartist Circular

Presumably one of the more complex embodied experiences experienced by Victorian periodical readers is that strange compound of pleasurable anticipation and impatient frustration that we call expectation.  This state, marking the interval between instalments, is not unknown to us either.  There are a number of electronic resources, in various stages of development, whose completion I […]

Hot off the press: “Rhyme, Rhythm, and the Materiality of Poetry” in Victorian Studies

Victorian Studies for Spring 2011 is just out, and it contains a fascinating section on poetry: Adela Pinch, “Rhyme’s End” (on Mary Elizabeth Coleridge) Beth Newman, “Alice Meynell, Walter Pater, and Aestheticist Temporality” Naomi Levine, “Trebled Beauty: William Morris’s Terza Rima” Stephen Arata, “Rhyme, Rhythm, and the Materiality of Poetry: Response”

Bad poetry or good verse? Felicia Hemans’ “Casabianca”
Bad poetry or good verse? Felicia Hemans' "Casabianca"

The British newspaper The Guardian features, for its current “poem of the week”, Felicia Hemans’ widely anthologised poem “Casabianca”. Its discussion, aimed at the general (educated, literate) reader, focuses on the merits of the poem as poetry, and whether it still deserves to be read. The critic, poet and creative writing professor Carol Rumens, wonders […]

Poets in Paris: Galignani’s Bookshop and Reading Room
Poets in Paris: Galignani's Bookshop and Reading Room

Mention Paris and bookshops and most people will perhaps think first of Shakespeare and Company, famously owned by Sylvia Beach and frequented by Joyce, Hemmingway and Pound. In Hemmingway’s late memoir of his life in Paris, A Movable Feast (1964), Sylvia Beach is about the only person who avoids his ridicule and wrath, as he documents […]