Invited Members of the DHSI Team for 2012 include the following leading and emerging research theorists and practitioners in the digital arts and humanities:

Invited Instructors

Neal Audenaert

John F. Barber (Washington State U, Vancouver) teaches in The Creative Media & Digital Culture program. His teaching and research focus on digital humanities, digital narratives, and technology studies. He is the developer and curator of Brautigan.NET, an online, interactive information structure known as the preeminent resource on the life and work of Richard Brautigan. Barber led the efforts to establish The Brautigan Library as a permanent, interactive installation within the Clark County Historical Museum in Vancouver, Washington. Future plans include reopening the Library for the submission of born digital works of electronic literature.

Jon Bath (U Saskatchewan) is Director of the Humanities and Fine Arts Digital Research Centre and adjunct faculty in the Department of English. He loves old books and new bicycles.

Syd Bauman (Brown U; returning) has worked at the Brown University Women Writers Project dealing with electronic texts since 1990. From 2001 to 2007 he was co-editor of the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI), and now spends most his time teaching TEI or helping people with their TEI projects.

Matt Bouchard (U of Toronto) is a PhD student working on information design in sports simulations. His research interests include a video game canon, game-first video game theory, interaction design, visualization, implementation pedagogy, and implementation advocacy.

Susan Brown (U Guelph / Alberta; returning) is Professor of English at the University of Guelph and Visiting Professor at the University of Alberta, and works on Victorian literature, women's writing, and digital humanities. All of these interests inform the Orlando Project, an ongoing experiment in online literary history textbase of which she is director and co-editor. She leads development of the Canadian Writing Research Collaboratory, which is producing a research environment for literary studies in and about Canada.



Hélène Cazes (U. Victoria, French; (hcazes@uvic.ca) is a grateful admirer of the generous TEI people who provide her and her students with editions of all kinds of medieval and Renaissance texts. She defines herself as a reader, interested in many topics such as medieval and early modern literature, history of the book, history of medicine, friendship, and childhood. Her most recent publications pertain to bibliography: what is a book? what is a reference? how to read a medium?

Melanie Chernyk (U Victoria, returning) is the Lab Coordinator for the ETCL, and former DHSI coordinator. She has an MA in English (with a DH focus) from UVic. She learned TEI at the 2005 DHSI, and has worked on several encoding projects since then. Among those endeavours was her MA project, a TEI-encoded edition of the 1607 jest book, The Pleasant Conceits of Old Hobson.

Constance Crompton (U Victoria) is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Electronic Textual Cultures Laboratory at the University of Victoria. She is co-director (with Michelle Schwartz, archivist at the Canadian Lesbian and Gay Archives) of Lesbian and Gay Liberation In Canada, an infrastructure pilot project of the Canadian Writing Research Collaboratory at the University of Alberta. A research collaborator with The Yellow Nineties Online, her research focuses on the representation of personhood in markup and programming languages, the production of identity in Victorian periodicals and popular culture, and the history of science.

Robin Davies (Vancouver Island U; returning) teaches in the Media Studies Department at Vancouver Island University. He studied Double Bass (BMus) and Music Technology (MA) at McGill's Schulich School of Music. His interests include the utilization of the human voice in auditory storytelling, sound design for visual art, the construction and use of software-based musical instruments for live electronic music performance, and helping others embrace technology for use in their creative endeavours. Robin's sound design and remix work can be heard on releases from six records, maple music, ad noiseam, and Sunchaser Pictures.

Julia Flanders (Brown U; returning) is past chair of the TEI Consortium, and director of the Women Writers Project at Brown University. She has spoken and published on the gender politics of editing as well as on theoretical and practical problems in text encoding.

Ian Gregory (Lancaster U; returning) is a Reader in Digital Humanities at Lancaster University. His research interests include the use of Geographic Information System (GIS) technology in the humanities, including both history and literary studies. He directs the European Research Council "Spatial Humanities" project.

Dene Grigar (Washington State U, Vancouver) is Associate Professor and Director of The Creative Media & Digital Culture Program, working in the area of electronic literature, emergent technology and cognition, and ephemera. She is the author of "Fallow Field: A Story in Two Parts" and "The Jungfrau Tapes: A Conversation with Diana Slattery about The Glide Project," both of which have appeared in the Iowa Review Web, and When Ghosts Will Die (with Canadian multimedia artist Steve Gibson), a piece that experiments with motion tracking technology to produce networked multimedia narratives. Her most recent project is the "Fort Vancouver Mobile," a project funded by a 2011 NEH Start Up Grant that brings together a core team of 20 scholars, digital storytellers, historians, and archaeologists to create location-aware nonfiction content for mobile phones to be used at the Fort Vancouver National Historic Site. She is also Associate Editor of Leonardo Reviews and Vice President of the Electronic Literature Organization.

Katherine D. Harris (San Jose State U) is a tenured Assistant Professor of English. Her research, teaching, and scholarly adventures focus on Romantic-Era and 19th-century British literature, women's authorship, the literary annual, 19th-century history print culture and history of the book, textuality, editorial theory, Digital Humanities, and pedagogy.

Martin Holmes (U Victoria, HCMC; returning) has a BA in English, and MPhil for research in Phonology, and the RSA Dip TEFLA. He taught English in the UK, Japan, Indonesia and Saudi Arabia before settling in Canada, where he now works as a Programmer/Consultant at the University of Victoria Humanities Computing and Media Centre.

David Hoover (New York U; returning) is Professor of English at NYU. His research interests include corpus stylistics, humanities computing, authorship attribution, statistical stylistics, linguistic stylistics, animal language and cognition, English language, and Old English meter.

Matt Huculak (Dalhousie University) is a Postdoctoral Fellow with Editing Modernism in Canada (EMiC). His research includes modernism, book history, and the digital humanities. He has worked in the publishing industry and on various digital-humanities projects, including the Modernist Journals Project at Brown University and the University of Tulsa.

Diane Jakacki (Georgia Institute of Technology) is a Marion L. Brittain Postdoctoral Fellow at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Her research interests include early modern drama and popular culture, digital humanitites and pedagogy, and multimedia theory and design.

Erin E. Kelly (UVic) is an Assistant Professor of English. Her research interests include sixteenth-century English drama, early modern religious discourse, and book history, particularly the centrality of the printed book to reformation culture.

Erik Kwakkel (Leiden U, Institute for Cultural Disciplines) is lecturer in manuscript studies and principal investigator of the NWO-funded research project "Turning Over a New Leaf". His interests include the physical appearance of the book before print and medieval book culture. His current work focuses on the emergence of the Gothic manuscript over the course of the twelfth century.

Will Luers (Washington State U, Vancouver) is a visiting professor in the Creative Media & Digital Culture program. Will's current research and artistic interest is in designing and publishing multimedia books as mobile apps. In general, his interests are in the expressive possibilities of web-based and digital cinema, including database documentaries, multimedia hypertext, networked video and locative storytelling.



Aimée Morrison (U Waterloo; returning) is Associate Professor in English, specializing in digital media studies. She has published on rhetorics of democracy on the Internet, email in romantic comedy, personal mommy blogging, and DH pedagogy and curriculum. Her current project, "Deciphering Digital Life Writing," blends the fields of digital media studies and auto/biography to understand self-representation online, and is funded by a SSHRC Standard Research Grant.

Michael Nixon (Simon Fraser U; returning) is a PhD student in the School of Interactive Art and Technology, investigating ways of enhancing believable virtual agents with models from psychology and performance art. In the past, he has taught courses in Internet Production for the Media Studies department at VIU, and has also spent several years in the web development industry in the Mid-Island region.

Brett Oppegaard (Washington State U, Vancouver) is Assistant Professor of Media Communication in the Creative Media and Digital Culture program, specializing in research of mobile place-based media, founding and coordinating the Fort Vancouver Mobile project, a National Endowment for the Humanities-sponsored partnership with the National Park Service. He has been experimenting with new digital media forms since the mid-1990s. He started and maintains the online resource www.mobilestorytelling.net, and his experiments in mobile interfaces even extend to his personal website.

Harvey Quamen

Stan Ruecker (Illinois institute of Technology, Chicago) is an Associate Professor of Design in the Institute of Design. His current research interests are in the areas of humanities visualization, information design, and computer-human interfaces. Much of his research is in support of people doing interpretation using digital methods, and the rest is in a variety of application areas such as health and education.

Jentery Sayers (U Victoria) is Assistant Professor of English, with interests in comparative media studies, materialist criticism, multimodal scholarly communication, 20th-century American fiction, sound studies, and the intersections of critical theory and digital studies.

Lynne Siemens (U Victoria; returning) is Assistant Professor with the School of Public Administration, with interests in entrepreneurship, organisational behaviour, research methodology, and management skill development in academic disciplines.

William J. Turkel (U Western Ontario) is an Associate Professor of History. His research and teaching interests include big history, digital and public history, STS, computational methods, fabrication and physical computing.

Adriaan van der Weel (Leiden U, the Netherlands) is Bohn professor of modern Dutch book history. His research interests are in the history of textual transmission, with a special focus on scholarly communication, and digital reading and literacy.

Markus Wust (North Carolina State U) is Digital Collections and Preservation Librarian. Besides his work on issues related to digital collections and digital curation, he is also interested in the digital humanities, digital publishing, and the application of mobile technologies to libraries, archives, and higher education.

Invited Speakers

Laura Mandel (Texas A&M) is Professor of English and Director of the Initiative for Digital Humanities, Media, and Culture.

Adriaan van der Weel (Leiden U, the Netherlands) is Bohn professor of modern Dutch book history. His research interests are in the history of textual transmission, with a special focus on scholarly communication, and digital reading and literacy.

DHSI Colloquium

Diane Jakacki (Georgia Institute of Technology) is chair of the DHSI Colloquium advisory group. She is a Marion L. Brittain Postdoctoral Fellow at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Her research interests include early modern drama and popular culture, digital humanitites and pedagogy, and multimedia theory and design.

DHSI Local Team

Ray Siemens (DHSI Director, U Victoria) is Canada Research Chair in Humanities Computing and Distinguished Professor of English at the University of Victoria with cross appointment in Computer Science.

Melanie Chernyk (U Victoria) is the Lab Coordinator for the ETCL, and former DHSI coordinator. She has an MA in English (with a DH focus) from UVic. She learned TEI at the 2005 DHSI, and has worked on several encoding projects since then. Among those endeavours was her MA project, a TEI-encoded edition of the 1607 jest book, The Pleasant Conceits of Old Hobson.

The Local DHSI Team at U Victoria includes members of the HCMC, a number Computing Systems' staff led by Marc Thoma (Infrastructure Lead) -- among them Patrick Frisby (Assistant Facility Coordinator) and Greg Fanning (Facility Consultant) -- as well as coordinators from services responsible for room bookings, residence accomodation, audio visual, catering, and a number of graduate student volunteers. We are exceptionally grateful for their support.

Contact info:
institut@uvic.ca P: 250-472-5401 F: 250-472-5681