Law : Program Requirements
The LLM in Law and Society is primarily a research-based degree. All students are required to enrol in the core Graduate Seminar in Law and Society (LAW 501) and the Graduate Seminar in Applied Legal Methodology (LAW 502). Students are also required to take at least one graduate course (1.5 units) in a non-Law discipline germane to their research. The balance of their course requirements will be made up from Law graduate, non-Law graduate, and upper-level Law undergraduate courses. Students will not be permitted to take for graduate credit a course which they have already taken-either here or at another university-for undergraduate credit.
Other (Law courses and/or graduate-level non-Law courses)
(twelve consecutive months). The residency requirement can only be waived in exceptional circumstances.
The length of the LLM thesis is generally 20,000 - 30,000 words (80-120 pages), excluding the abstract, notes, bibliography, and appendices.
After completion of the Graduate Seminar in Law and Society (LAW 501), the Graduate Seminar in Applied Legal Methodology (LAW 502), a Graduate (non-Law) course, and another course worth 1.5 units, and on the recommendation of the supervisory committee and the Graduate Program Director, an LLM student may transfer to the Project-Based Option and fulfil the program requirements by completing two additional courses (3 units in Law graduate, non-Law graduate, and/or upper-level Law undergraduate courses) and the Major Research Paper (LAW 598) to obtain a total of 15.0 credits. No more than 3 units of the program may be at the undergraduate level.
The minimum residency period for the LLM program is three terms (twelve consecutive months). The residency requirement can only be waived in exceptional circumstances. Unless otherwise noted, the other requirements for the LLM non-thesis option are the same as for the LLM thesis option.
Students’ major research papers will be supervised by one Law and one non-Law Faculty member (subject to appropriate supervisory resources being available). The length of the LLM Major Research Paper is generally 12,500 - 17,500 words (50-70 pages), excluding the abstract, notes, bibliography, and appendices.
The PhD in Law and Society follows the general pattern at the University of Victoria. Students who already possess a master's degree in law or a related field may be admitted directly to the PhD. They are required to complete the two core Graduate Seminars and such other courses (if any) as the Graduate Program Director determines, taking into account their academic preparation.
Students must be enrolled in LAW 693 (PhD Candidacy Examination) until they pass the Candidacy Examination and are then permitted to enroll in LAW 699 (PhD Dissertation). PhD students' dissertations must meet the University's standards for doctoral dissertations.
2 courses (as approved by the Graduate Program Director)
(1.5 each)
3.0**
PhD Dissertation (LAW 699)
21.0-27.0
A student registered in the LLM program, after completion of the Graduate Seminar in Law and Society (LAW 501), the Graduate Seminar in Applied Legal Methodology (LAW 502), and 2 courses (1.5 units each) as approved by the Graduate Program Director, and on the recommendation of the supervisory committee and the Graduate Program Director, may transfer to the PhD program and fulfil the program requirements by completing the PhD Candidacy Examination (LAW 693) and PhD Dissertation (LAW 699). Additional coursework may be required at the discretion of the Graduate Program Director. The total unit value of the program must be at least 45 units.
The minimum residency requirement for the PhD program is three terms (12 consecutive months). The residency requirement can only be waived in exceptional circumstances. Students are required to complete a minimum total of five terms (20 months) of full-time registration.
The dissertation is expected to be of the highest possible calibre, potentially publishable, and should be 62,500 - 87,500 words (250-350 pages) excluding the abstract, notes, bibliography, and appendices.