PROGRAM OVERVIEW: COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

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First Nations Generative Curriculum in Child and Youth Care: The Four Strands of Coursework

The Generative Curriculum Model (GCM) courses that make up the Diploma in Child and Youth Care are grouped into four basic content themes or 'strands'. The four strands, as listed across the top of the Diploma Program: Curriculum & Credentials chart below, are:

  • Child and Youth Care
  • Communication Skills
  • Child Development
  • Practica

 

The Diploma Program: Curriculum & Credentials chart depicts the recommended delivery format for the Program. However, the sequence of courses is somewhat flexible, and may be revised to suit the specific CYC training needs of your First Nation community. The program format is established during the creation of the Memorandum of Agreement.

Three courses are also available for community development purposes.



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  Child and Youth Care Communication Skills Child Development Practica
Term 1 CYCB 120: Introduction
to Play
CYCB 150: Interpersonal
Communications
CYCB 141: Child Development 1 CYCB 110
Practicum 1:
Community Care Settings for Children and Youth
Term 2 CYCB 121: Foundations
of Curriculum Planning
CYCB 151: Communicating with Children and Guiding Children's Behaviour CYCB 142: Child Development 2 CYCB 111
Practicum 2:
The Whole Child

(block)
Term 3 CYCB 122: Curriculum
Design & Implementation
CYCB 123: The Caring & Learning Environment CYCB 140: Introduction to Human Behaviour CYCB 112
Practicum 3:
The Child in the Curriculum

(block)
Term 4 CYCB 230: The Ecology of Health, Safety and Nutrition CYCB 250: Introduction to
Planned Change
CYCB 222: Program Development for Infants and Toddlers CYCB 210
Practicum 4: Developmental Specialization

(block)
Term 5 CYCB 231: Administration of Child Care Facilities CYCB 251: Communication Skills for Professional Helpers CYCB 240: Supported Child Care for Children with Special Needs CYCB 211
Practicum 5: Supported Child Care for Children with Special Needs

(block)

Electives:
CYCB 220: Introduction to School-Age Care
CYCB 221: Introduction to Programs for Adolescents





* All courses are 1.5 credit units



Additional requirement to receive Diploma:
One university accredited English course




  • The Diploma is recognized in 4 Western provinces in Canada for ECE certification at a supervisory level
  • Students receive a total of 30 UVic credits upon completion of the Diploma in Child and Youth Care, which is equivalent to the first two years of a Child and Youth Care degree (BA)
  • Students who complete the Diploma may apply for entry into 3rd year at UVic in Child and Youth Care
  • Child and Youth Care degrees are recognized in BC as preparation for child protection practice
  • The Diploma coursework prepares students for a wide range of jobs working with children, youth and families in home, school, and community settings

Notes to the Scope and Sequence Chart

  1. Students who choose to complete a BA degree in Child and Youth Care through the University of Victoria will be required to take CYC 201: Introduction to the Profession at some time during their four years of study. Students can apply to complete their B.A. via either the UVic distance education program or through on-campus courses.
  2. Students are required to complete 1.5 units of University of Victoria or university transfer English.
  3. The five term structure is flexible. An alternative sequence of course delivery may be arranged.
  4. For ECE certification students are additionally required to complete a first aid training course and a 500-hour block placement.



STRAND: EARLY CHILDHOOD CARE AND EDUCATION/CHILD AND YOUTH CARE


CYCB 120 Introduction to Play (ECCE)

This course introduces students to program planning for young children and the concept of learning through play. The course explores the relationship between play and child development, the stages of children's play and factors that influence play. It encourages students to incorporate theories and research findings about play into a description of appropriate practice. In addition to text information, throughout the course Elders and students generate insights about play from the perspective of their own First Nation's culture.

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CYCB 121 Foundations of Curriculum Planning (ECCE)

This course builds on the knowledge students acquired in Introduction to Play (CYCB 120). The course provides students with the foundation knowledge and skills needed to plan culturally and developmentally appropriate programs for young children in their communities. Students are introduced to the guidelines for curriculum planning. Students explore three common philosophies of program planning with an introduction to specific contact areas while discussing the role of the child, the educator and the parent. Throughout the course Elders and students generate insights into program planning from the perspective of their own community and culture. (Prerequisite: CYCB 120).

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CYCB 122 Curriculum Design and Implementation (ECCE)

This course builds on the knowledge students acquired in Introduction to Play (CYCB 120) and Foundations of Curriculum Planning (CYCB 121). It provides students with expanded experiences in designing and implementing programs for preschool children. Specific curriculum content areas of art, music, math, science and social studies are further developed in the context of refining program planning developed in the two previous courses. Throughout the course Elders and students generate insights into planning for children from their own community and culture. (Prerequisites: CYCB 120, CYCB 121).

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CYCB 220 Introduction to School-Age Care (CYC)

This course provides students with an overview of school-age care. Students explore the needs and interests of children, families, and care providers regarding school-age care. They explore the developmental needs of school-age children, and consider the implications of children's developmental needs for school-age practice. In addition, students are introduced to planning and implementing a program of care for diverse groups of school-age children. The course acknowledges and builds on the knowledge that students already possess, and includes activities intended to elicit students' perspectives based on their own experience. Throughout the course Elders and students generate insights into the care of school-age children from their own community and culture.

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CYCB 221 Introduction to Programs for Adolescents (CYC)

This course provides students with an overview of adolescent development and supportive work with youth. Students learn the importance of understanding the psychological and sociological context within which youth live. They learn how to identify issues to which workers might be required to respond, how to become informed about these issues, and how they relate to the cultural context in which particular adolescents live. In addition, students explore intervention possibilities and how these interventions relate to specific issues in particular cultural contexts. The course acknowledges and builds on the knowledge of adolescents that students already possess, and includes activities intended to elicit students' perspectives of their experience. Throughout the course, Elders and students will work from the perspective of their own community and culture to generate knowledge about supporting adolescents.

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CYCB 230 The Ecology of Health, Safety and Nutrition for Children

Methods of meeting children's needs for health, safety and nutrition vary according to culture and environment, so this course will explore the needs of children in the communities where learners plan to work. Traditional ways of ensuring health and safety will be considered alongside strategies for educating and working with parents, families and community members. Students will identify a community health issue, identify health indicators, and explore community-based solutions.

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CYCB 231 Administration of Child Care Facilities

The essentials of administering a child care facility on and off reserve will be explored including: staffing management; program development; budget management; implementing statuatory regulations and meeting regional health standards. Students will be required to plan and design a new childcare facility, including identifying and meeting all appropriate regulations and standards for quality. Students will formulate an illustrative set of policies to establish practice principles appropriate to the context of their community.

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STRAND: COMMUNICATIONS


CYCB 123 The Caring and Learning Environment (ECCE)

This course, taken either concurrently or after Curriculum Design and Implementation (CYCB 122), studies the total environment of a child care facility and the integration of these environmental elements. Students investigate theories of building environments that nurture and educate, design and plan such environments, and examine ways of administering and managing these environments. The course acknowledges and builds on the knowledge of learning environments and content areas that students have previously studied, and it includes activities intended to elicit from them the perspectives of their own experience. Throughout the course Elders and students generate insights into learning environments from the perspective of First Nations cultures. (Pre- or corequisites: CYCB 122).

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CYCB 150 Interpersonal Communications

This course introduces students to the characteristics and dynamics of interpersonal communications. It provides an opportunity for students to consider their own communication practices, and gain personal awareness. They also improve their skills in the areas of self-concept, personal learning styles, perception, verbal and nonverbal communication, active listening, understanding of relationships, and the expression of feelings. Throughout the course Elders and students give insights into interpersonal communications from the perspective of their own culture. Students also produce a portfolio that represents their reflection on and integration of the course material.

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CYCB 151 Communicating with Children and Guiding Children's Behaviour

This course introduces students to methods of communicating with children that help foster positive child development. It provides an introduction to three theoretical approaches to guiding children. Students identify and practice effective methods of communicating with children within the context of various theoretical approaches. Throughout the course the perspectives of the First Nation's community regarding communicating with children and guiding children's behaviour are elicited from Elders and students.

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CYCB 250 Introduction to Planned Change

This course introduces students to the components of helping relationships and models of helping used by professional child and youth care practitioners and provides opportunities to understand planned interventions within historical First Nations contexts. Students will explore the interpersonal dimensions of child and youth care practice in relation to supporting children, youth and families. Throughout the course Elders and students will generate insights into professional helping skills from the perspectives of their First Nations culture(s).

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CYCB 251 Communication Skills for Professional Helpers

This course acknowledges and builds on prior knowledge of communication skills and includes activities that elicit perspectives emerging from their own experience. This course is designed to provide students with opportunities to learn and practice helping skills used by professional child and youth care workers in situations requiring interventions. Throughout the course the perspectives of the aboriginal community re: communication skills for professional helpers will be elicited from Elders and students.

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STRAND: CHILD AND YOUTH DEVELOPMENT


CYCB 140 Introduction to Human Behaviour

This course provides students with an overview of the principles that guide the scientific study of human behaviour. The child and youth care profession rests on a large and constantly expanding base of research. This course introduces students to some of that research. Students learn the terminology and theories that serve as a foundation for future coursework in child and youth care. This course is intended to be taught generatively. Throughout the course Elders and students generate insights into human behaviour from the perspective of their own culture.

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CYCB 141 Child Development 1

This course introduces students to normative child development from conception to toddlerhood. It includes an overview of the major themes and theories in child development addressing research in the areas of physical, intellectual, and psychosocial development. As well as including insights from major researchers and theorists whose roots lie in western traditions, the course builds on traditional practices and theories of the First Nations community by including Elders' teachings and experiences of the students.

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CYCB 142 Child Development 2

This course continues the study of child development from early childhood to late adolescence addressing perspectives on physical, intellectual, psychosocial and moral development of children and youth. The course acknowledges and builds on the knowledge of child development that students already possess, and it includes activities intended to elicit from them the perspectives of their own experience. Throughout the course Elders and students generate insights into child development from the perspective of their own community and culture. (Prerequisite: CYCB 141).

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CYCB 222 Program Development for Infants and Toddlers

Developing child care programs for children (0-2 years) will be the focus of this course. Theories of caring and attachment as a foundation to care routines will be studied. Students will explore culturally specific approaches through consultation with respected community members. Using an ecological model that situates child care within social systems, students will develop partnerships with families and community networks and explore ways to access resources within and beyond their communities.

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CYCB 240 Introduction to Supported Child Care for Children with Special Needs

This course will explore a range of methods for meeting the needs of children who require additional supports. The focus will be on planning for inclusive child care while incorporating environmental and contextual supports, including the family. Students will examine the principles of inclusive child care within the current policy and statuatory environment. Students will locate resources within the context of rural practice and critically examine the principle of cultural responsiveness in inclusive child care.

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STRAND: PRACTICA


CYCB 110 Practicum 1: Community Care Settings for Children and Youth

This course orients students to the field of child and youth care. Students have opportunities to meet local members of the profession and visit local programs and agencies serving children, youth, and their families. The structure of services and supports to children, youth and their families is explored within the context of a specific community. Elders and helping professionals address the service needs and current responses within the community. Students will also learn and practice methods of obtaining information about children's development through direct observation in formal and informal settings and will be supervised in making informed interpretations.

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CYCB 111 Practicum 2: The Whole Child

This course provides students with opportunities to begin participating with young children in early childhood care and education settings. Students will focus on observing young children across physical, emotional, social, cognitive and spiritual areas of development. While observing children, students will begin to develop an understanding of how to respond to children's needs and interests by planning and implementing activities that are developmentally and culturally appropriate. Students will become familiar with the roles and responsibilities of the early childhood practitioner by participating as a team member with staff and interacting with children and their families in communities under supervision. (Prerequisite: CYCB 110).

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CYCB 112 Practicum 3: The Child in the Curriculum

This course provides further opportunities to learn about early childhood care and education settings. Students take increasing initiative and develop self-evaluative skills in planning and conducting activities and creating effective learning environments. Students will gain understanding of the roles and responsibilities of professional work by planning and implementing programs. The objectives also include developing awareness of practice in a variety of settings, learning appropriate care routines and developing good interpersonal skills for working with children. (Prerequisite: CYCB 111).

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CYCB 210 Practicum with Developmental Specialization

Students will develop programs and routines that are specialized for supporting healthy development with specific age groups, such as infants and toddlers, school-age children, or adolescents. Students will study practical aspects of care such as safety and appropriate guidance. Students will learn how to build program curriculum based on developmental needs and use evaluation to amend and enhance programming. The development of resources and community contacts will also be an essential part of the practicum.

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CYCB 211 Practicum in Supported Child Care for Children with Special Needs

This practicum focuses on meeting the specific needs of a child or children in the context of culture, community and family. Students may choose options such as creating inclusive curriculum, working through the steps of developing support plans in consultation with team members, or implementing aspects of existing support plans. Students will be required to investigate and work with local resources, including professionals who provide specialized support, which are culturally appropriate and enhancing.

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See also
       Web Resources
       Vocational Outcomes
       Program Philosophy
       Generative Curriculum Model
       Community Based Delivery