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News

Exclusive: "Vincent, in the Dream of Zundert" by 2014 Far Horizons Poetry Prize Winner Laura Ritland

Vincent Van GoghHave you heard? Laura Ritland won this year's Far Horizons Award for Poetry with her piece, "Vincent, in the Dream of Zundert." The poem will be published in our Winter 2015 issue, but you can get an exclusive sneak peek here in all its glory!

Here's what contest judge Julie Bruck had to say about Ritland's poem:

"This letter poem from Vincent Van Gogh to his brother Theo was born to be a pantoum. Vincent's circular attempts to retrieve a childhood place and time before the 'shadows' of madness closed in find their pulse in the pantoum's pattern of repetitions. The form takes one step forward, three steps back, until the reader is also caught in the thwarted, head-banging sensation of trying to resurrect a lost past."

Read "Vincent, in the Dream of Zundert" in full.

See the announcement page for Ritland's contest win.


Interviews

Spotlight: Interview with Liz Windhorst Harmer, 2013 Constance Rooke Creative Nonfiction Contest Winner

Liz HarmerThinking about submitting to the 2014 Constance Rooke Creative Nonfiction Prize (deadline August 1)? Why not read an interview with last year's winner, Liz Windhorst Harmer? Fellow Echolocation editor Michael Prior talks with Harmer about her winning piece, "Blip," and how the contest has opened many doors to the literary world.

MP: It's been a year since you won the Constance Rooke Creative Nonfiction Prize for "Blip," which also recently won gold in the Personal Journalism category at the 34th annual National Magazine Awards. I know your work is forthcoming in numerous magazines. Tell us what you've been up to—what new projects are you undertaking, what new exciting things are in your life?

LWH:Yes, between the NMA win and the NMA nominations it’s been a pretty exciting year so far. I have short stories forthcoming in Grain and The Dalhousie Review, and an essay coming out in a Creative Nonfiction Anthology. "Blip" is going to be reprinted in a Nonvella anthology, which is great. I'm trying to write a couple of essays, one about working and boredom, and the other about falling in love. I've begun to work on my thesis, a novel, which I'm writing under the mentorship of Charles Foran, and I'm trying to read about quantum physics for that project.

Read the rest of Michael Prior's interview with Liz Windhorst Harmer.

Enter the 2014 Constance Rooke Creative Nonfiction Contest.


News

Congratulations to Laura Ritland, Winner of the 2014 Far Horizons Award for Poetry!

Laura RitlandThe winner of this year's Far Horizons Award for Poetry is Laura Ritland! Her poem, "Vincent, in the Dream of Zundert," beat out close to 800 contest entries and was chosen by final judge Julie Bruck as the 2014 winner. Here's a taste of her praise for Ritland's poem: "Both dark and golden, the poem roils like a Van Gogh wheat field. While it enacts the movement of a very particular mind and evokes the brushwork of a singular hand, this poem belongs to its readers."

About Laura: she graduated from the University of British Columbia in 2013 with a B.A. in Creative Writing and English Literature, and is currently completing her M.A. in Creative Writing at the University of Toronto. Her poems have previously appeared or are forthcoming in Branch Magazine, The Maynard, Qwerty and Contemporary Verse 2. Starting this September, she will be working on her creative Master’s thesis under the mentorship of Karen Solie.

Thank you to everyone who entered this year's contest!

Read more on the 2014 Far Horizons Poetry Award Winner announcement page.


Issues

Our Back Pages:
Issue #24, October 1972

Issue #24

Following the success of our 50 Issues Project, in which we highlighted select back issues in honour of the University of Victoria’s 50th anniversary, we decided to cast our gaze back, chronologically, over our complete backlist…to include (eventually!) brief reviews of every issue not previously covered. Featured issues will be highlighted on our website biweekly.

Here's what Assistant Professor Matt Pollard (from UVic's Germanic and Slavic Studies) had to say about Issue #24:

Against the trend of his writings and their import being obscured and even distorted by critics with ideological agendas of their own, editor and translator David Thatcher successfully assembles a volume which gives Nietzsche “the right kind of attention— serious, responsible, dispassionate, unpartisan.” He takes note of how the Nietzsche revival from the 1950s shows no signs of abating, something which was as true then as it is now.

Continue reading about this week's featured issue.


Reviews

Our Reviews Page Gets a Facelift!

MxTBright. Colourful. Literary. We've revamped the Reviews page to include a cover image of every book of poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction, and we hope you like it!

The Malahat Review is always working to make its website more accessible and visually stimulating to visitors. Books have been organized by genre and year so it's even easier to browse!

See the new Reviews page here.

Check out a recent review of Sina Queyra's MxT.


Interviews

Spotlight: Interview with Anne Compton, Contributor to Issue 187, Summer 2014

Anne ComptonMalahat volunteer stephen leckie interviewed Anne Compton for the July edition of Malahat lite. Anne contributes three poems to the summer issue, titled "Tablecloth and Other Compound Words," "Sleeping in the spare," and "The River in Spring." She is the winner of numerous literary awards, including the Atlantic Poetry Prize, the Governor General's Award for Poetry, and a National Magazine Award in Poetry.

SL: To borrow a question from Tim Bowling: have reviews and awards affected your process, affirmed that your senses are sharp and discerning?

AC: Receiving an award is affirming, a confirmation that someone’s reading your work, but an award in no way changes one’s deeply intuitive writing habits. Oddly enough, though, reviews can alert you to practices in your work that you weren’t aware of. A UK reviewer said “[Compton’s] style is to use quite short sentences combined into long lines. Her technique is to push quite dense material into the short sentences and then pull that through the long lines so that you hang on to the threads of what she is doing” (Manchester Review). I had no idea that my thinking unfolded in that way.

Read the rest of stephen leckie's interview with Anne Compton.


News

Far Horizons Award for Poetry - 25 Finalists Announced!

Far Horizons25 finalists for the 2014 Far Horizons Poetry Award contest have been chosen! Author names and titles of pieces are available for viewing on the Far Horizons Poetry Finalists Announcement Page.

The winner will be announced by July 15 online.


E-Newsletter

Malahat lite: July 2014 Edition

Liz HarmerGet your summer literary fix right here! Here's what's in this month's e-newsletter:

Interviews: Liz Windhorst Harmer talks about life since winning the Constance Rooke Creative Nonfiction Prize in 2013 (her same piece won Gold at the National Magazine Awards!), and Anne Compton lets us in on language, process and inspiration in poems set to appear in Issue 187, Summer 2014.

Features: a special $15 subscription offer, a sneak peek at our upcoming summer issue (with great reviews of books by Andrea Routley and Barry Dempster, to name a few), Our Back Pages Issue 23 from 1972, and more!

Discover all this and more in the newsletter.


E-Newsletter

Sign Up for Malahat Literary Updates

Malahat liteThe Malahat Review wants to keep you in the loop! Each month, we send out literary news, updates, and announcements in Malahat lite, a special e-newsletter. Contest calls for entries, interviews with award winners and sneak peeks at future issues are just some of what we feature.

If you'd like to receive Malahat lite as well as promotional notices about literary contests and events, send us an email: malahat@uvic.ca.

Take a look at a recent edition of Malahat lite to see what you've been missing!


Issues

Our Back Pages:
Issue #23, July 1972

Issue #23

Following the success of our 50 Issues Project, in which we highlighted select back issues in honour of the University of Victoria’s 50th anniversary, we decided to cast our gaze back, chronologically, over our complete backlist…to include (eventually!) brief reviews of every issue not previously covered. Featured issues will be highlighted on our website biweekly.

Here's what Malahat assistant editor Rhonda Batchelor had to say about Issue #23:

Before the Malahat initiated its Long Poem Prize, the stage had been set for longer works. This issue opens with “Tiresias: A Poem” by the Irish poet Austin Clarke (1896-1974), a twenty-page tour de force erotic imagining of the classical character who experienced life (and sex) as both male and female. Tiresias is asked to “Speak now and be fearless. / Did you enjoy in the consummatory moments of love-making / greater bliss as woman or man?” The “answer” may surprise you.

Continue reading about this week's featured issue.


Issues

Issue 187, Summer 2014 Book Reviews Online

The Outside World

The Malahat Review's summer issue is almost finalized, and its contents are sizzling! Can't wait? Check out the book reviews posted to our website!

Reviews of poetry from Mary Dalton, Laurie D. Graham, Deena Kara Shaffer, and Sina Queyras; fiction from Kim Aubrey, Andrea Routley, and Barry Dempster; creative nonfiction from Lorri Neilsen Glenn (Ed.).

Read the reviews from Issue #187's table of contents.


Subscribe

Summer Sale - $15 For a Year's Subscription!

Summer Sub SaleThe Malahat Review has launched into summer with a special discounted subscription rate, just for you! Take advantage of our smokin' hot subscription sale now - only $15 for one year (that's a $20 discount!).

Vacation or staycation, don't miss out on the best poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction around. Buy a subscription for yourself or a friend - you can even extend your current sub!

See our summer sub page for more details, including highlighted summer authors.


Interviews

Spotlight: Interview with A. F. Moritz, Contributor to Issue 186, Spring 2014

A. F. MoritzMalahat poetry intern Samantha Ainsworth interviewed A. F. Moritz for the June edition of Malahat lite. Moritz's poetry contribution includes ""The Wind That Blows Through Winter," "Entrances," "A Definition of Pity," "The Eye," "Hermes," and "Poetry." He has won numerous awards, including a Guggenheim Fellowship, the ReLit Award, and the Griffin Poetry Prize.

SA: Your six poems in this Issue vary in form, style, and subject, but each one packs a punch. The compelling diction and language draws the reader in, creates lovely and sometimes horrific images and revelations. How do your poems present themselves to you in their infancy? Do you work from an image or thought and then go from there?

AFM: They present themselves as music, an idea for music. Now, in poetry of course, and this point is often missed, meanings are a major part of the music. The sensible qualities of words include their meanings as a major part, and the poet has to have a concept of music in which the rhythm and the adherences and repulsions of ideas are prominent, and in which there’s something analogous to chromatism in the arrangement of the colourings of words, which include their sounds and accents, yes, but equally their meanings and connotations.

Read the rest of Samantha's interview with A. F. Moritz.


Issues

Our Back Pages:
Issue #22, April 1972

Issue #22

Following the success of our 50 Issues Project, in which we highlighted select back issues in honour of the University of Victoria’s 50th anniversary, we decided to cast our gaze back, chronologically, over our complete backlist…to include (eventually!) brief reviews of every issue not previously covered. Featured issues will be highlighted on our website biweekly.

Here's what Malahat volunteer Karyn Wisselink had to say about Issue #22:

Issue 22 is among the first issues of The Malahat Review to be edited solely by Robin Skelton and the third to include an editorial comment. Although John Peter and Robin Skelton previously deemed editorial comments unnecessary, this particular comment rounds out the issue nicely. Skelton explains that the issue is largely devoted to material from or about Ireland and gives readers a short introduction to the Irish perspective from, of course, Skelton’s perspective.

Continue reading about this week's featured issue.


News

The Malahat Review Wins Two National Magazine Awards!

Liz Windhorst HarmerCongratulations are in order for Liz Windhorst Harmer and Monica Kidd, two Malahat authors who won gold and silver at the 34th Annual National Magazine Awards on June 6, 2014.

Harmer won a Gold Award in the Personal Journalism category for "Blip," and Kidd won a Silver Award in the Profiles Category for "Keeper of the Marks." The Malahat has never before won a Gold award for Personal Journalism and it is our first win in the Profiles category.

Read more about both wins on our special announcement page.


Submit

We're Live with Submittable!

SubmittableAs of June 6, 2014, The Malahat Review is accepting regular poetry submissions using Submittable. Fiction and creative nonfiction submissions will be accepted later this year.

A Submittable account is free and it's easy to join. Unlike other literary journals, we don't charge writers to submit their work using Submittable. And our reading period runs all year! Send us 3-5 poems (up to 6 pages of poetry maximum) for your chance at big publication (and big pay).

Visit our submissions page for full details, and to access our Submittable site.


E-Newsletter

Malahat lite: June 2014 Edition

A. F. MoritzSummer's just around the corner, and we have a selection of hot interviews in this month's e-newsletter!

Interviews: Poetry champion A. F. Moritz talks philosophy and early influences; theatre master Priscila Uppal, judge for the 2014 Constance Rooke Creative Nonfiction Contest, lets us in on what she's looking for in winning entries; and Dora Dueck discusses the mechanics of her winning Novella 2014 entry, "Mask."

Podcast: Christine Walde examines Sylvia Plath and Ted Hughes' cross-Canadian camping trip in 1959, and reads from poetry contributions to Issue 186, Spring 2014 that were inspired by Plath and Hughes' stay in Rock Lake Campground.

Discover all this and more in the newsletter.


Contests

Creative Nonfiction Contest Call for Entries

CNF PrizeDeadline: August 1, 2014
Prize: $1,000 to one winner
Entry fee: $35 for Canadians, $40 for US residents, and $45 outside Canada/US
Additional entries cost $15 from anywhere!

The Malahat Review is pleased to announce its annual call for entries to the 2014 Constance Rooke Creative Nonfiction Prize.

We're on the lookout for all things personal! Spend the summer months perfecting your memoir, essay, travel narrative (or any other CNF form) and send it to us by August 1 for your chance at publication and big prize money. This year's judge will be Priscila Uppal.

All entrants will receive a complimentary 1-year subscription to The Malahat Review.

Full contest details available here, including payment and submission options.


Issues

Our Back Pages:
Issue #19, July 1971

Issue #19

Following the success of our 50 Issues Project, in which we highlighted select back issues in honour of the University of Victoria’s 50th anniversary, we decided to cast our gaze back, chronologically, over our complete backlist…to include (eventually!) brief reviews of every issue not previously covered. Featured issues will be highlighted on our website biweekly.

Here's what Malahat volunteer Robin Reniero had to say about Issue #19:

I would be remiss to start without drawing attention to the provocative and mesmerizing cover photograph by Don Ross whose works are explored by the late Burton Kurth, then Associate Professor at UVic and much-loved patron of the arts.  The cover image, which resembles an eye the longer I looked at it, seems to invite the reader to step inside and see the world as the artist sees it. I can’t help but sense that I’m about to enter into a multi-layered creative space.

Continue reading about this week's featured issue.


News

Erin Frances Fisher Wins RBC Bronwen Wallace Award for Emerging Writers

Erin FisherCongratulations are in order for Erin Frances Fisher, who was named the winner of the Browen Wallace Award for Emerging Writers on May 27, 2014 at a special Writers' Trust Gala in Toronto. She won $5,000 for her short fiction piece, "Girl." The award has a track record for identifying some of this country’s finest developing writers. Past winners include Malahat authors Michelle Berry, Marjorie Celona, Michael Crummey and Alison Pick.

Fisher is a previous winner of The Malahat Review's Open Season Award for Fiction. She took home $1,000 for her win, and her story, "Apiculture," was published in Issue 178, Spring 2012.

Read the full press release on Fisher's win from the Writers' Trust website.

Read an interview with Erin Frances Fisher on her 2012 Open Season Award win.


News

Sina Queyras Nominated for Pushcart Prize

Sina QueyrasThe Malahat Review congratulates Sina Queyras, whose poem “Like a Jet” (Issue 184, Autumn 2013) has been shortlisted for a Pushcart Prize. Her poem was also recently nominated in the poetry category for the 37th annual National Magazine Awards, which will be announced in Toronto on June 6, 2014.

Read more about her Pushcart Prize nomination here.

Check out Sina Queyras' literary website, Lemon Hound.


Contests

Translation Contest Deadline Extended!

Translation PrizeNew deadline: June 15, 2014
Prize: $1,000 to one winner
Entry fee: $15 for each translated poem

The Malahat Review has extended the deadline for its one-time translation contest of les poésies francophones du Canada!

A prize of $1,000 will be awarded to the best translation of a poem in French, from Quebec or elsewhere in Canada, into English. The winning entry will be announced in late summer 2014, will be published in At Home in Translation, and the winner will be interviewed for the Malahat website and e-newsletter.

Translations must be of published French-language poems that do not exceed 60 lines including stanza breaks. The winning translation must also succeed in English as a work of the imagination.

Want full contest details? Look no further.

Get Inspired: Read an Interview with Donald Winkler, translation contest judge.


Issues

Our Back Pages:
Issue #18, April 1971

Issue #18

Following the success of our 50 Issues Project, in which we highlighted select back issues in honour of the University of Victoria’s 50th anniversary, we decided to cast our gaze back, chronologically, over our complete backlist…to include (eventually!) brief reviews of every issue not previously covered. Featured issues will be highlighted on our website biweekly.

Issue 18 is rich in humour. In the popular section, “An Atlas of Poetry,” German Reiner Kunze’s “The Bearers of Beethoven” conjures Kafkaesque comedy while “Sercambi’s Novella of Avarice and Lust” (translated from the medieval Italian by Joseph Ranallo) delivers a four-page amusement about a conniver’s stratagems against an insatiable woman. Alisa Weinrich’s “The Discontented Wife” sees a priggish and ornery newlywed plopped into an affair that gives her bafflement and guilt of happiness. Improbably, the fling helps save her marriage.

Continue reading about Issue #18.

Learn more about Our Back Pages.


Interviews

Spotlight: Interview with Amy Jones, Contributor to Issue 186, Spring 2014

Amy JonesFormer Malahat publicity manager Susan Sanford Blades interviewed Amy Jones for the May edition of Malahat lite. Amy's story "Die Young" features funerals, asshats and expensive cowlicks from the point of view of four close friends. Her short story collection What Boys Like and other Stories was shortlisted for the 2010 ReLit Award. This is her first publication in the Malahat.

SSB: What was the inspiration for “Die Young”? Did you set out to explore death and quarter-life malaise or was it spawned by an image or something else?

AJ: I had gone to a couple of funerals in a row and was thinking a lot about death and funerals and you know, the whole pointlessness of everything and just generally being weird and moody and wanting to write about it. A lot of my stories start like that: with me wanting to process something that I’ve experienced or that I’ve been obsessing over, and using that kind of as a jumping-off point for something fictional. I feel like if I can transform something, make it happen to other characters in a different setting or in a different way or whatever, that it helps me understand it better.

Read the rest of Susan's interview with Amy Jones.


News

Three Malahat Authors Nominated for National Magazine Awards

Liz Windhorst HarmerKudos to our contributors! The Malahat Review would like to congratulate Sina Queyras, Monica Kidd, and Liz Windhorst Harmer on their National Magazine Awards in three different categories: Poetry, Profiles, and Professional Journalism, respectively.

The nominations were made public on May 1, and the winners will be announced on June 6 at the National Magazine Awards gala in Toronto.

Read more about these nominations, and the history of the Malahat at the NMAs.


E-Newsletter

Malahat lite: May 2014 Edition

Tricia DowerThe Spring issue of the Malahat is being delivered to mailboxes around the globe this week, and we're happy to launch May's virtual newsletter at the same time! Here's a glance at what's inside:

Interviews: Amy Jones discusses character building in "Die Young," her fiction contribution to our Spring issue; Tricia Dower talks Friend benefits; and Matt Rader opens up about his 2014 Jack Hodgins Founders' Award for Fiction win.

Contests: details on Les poésies francophones du Canada: A Translation Prize, whose deadline is fast approaching (May 15)! Enter an English translation of a published French-language poem for your chance to win $1,000 and publication in At Home in Translation, our Fall 2014 Issue.

There's lots more in the newsletter! Read May's Malahat lite here.


Issues

Our Back Pages:
Issue #16, October 1970

Issue #16

Following the success of our 50 Issues Project, in which we highlighted select back issues in honour of the University of Victoria’s 50th anniversary, we decided to cast our gaze back, chronologically, over our complete backlist…to include (eventually!) brief reviews of every issue not previously covered. Featured issues will be highlighted on our website biweekly.

The poetry and fiction in Issue #16 are both anchored to an alien land, a land of margins. We, the readers, are always in the presence of the disconnected: Dugan Gilman’s blind man, drinking under a bridge; Rosemary Silverman’s Nanine, lost in old countryside, in childhood memory; and, of course, the greatest misfit of them all, Jorge Luis Borge’s Billy the Kid. Travelling from poem to story to poem, we become wandering protagonists of our own volition.

Continue reading about Issue #16.

Learn more about Our Back Pages.


Interviews

Spotlight: Interview with Donald Winkler, Judge for the Malahat's Translation Prize

Donald WinklerMalahat volunteer Benjamin Willems interviewed Donald Winkler for April's e-newsletter, Malahat lite. Winkler is the judge for Les poésies francophones du Canada, a special one-time poetry contest that celebrates the translation of French poems into English (deadline is May 15). The contest winner will be published in At Home in Translation, our upcoming summer issue dedicated entirely to works translated from any language into English.

BW: Is there a point where you start to recognize the traits of translation? And is that welcome, for the most part?

DW: By “trait” do you mean the giveaway that this is but a shadow on Plato’s wall? The trait of the traitor? The moment when it dawns on you that there is a real world elsewhere? I am most aware that I am reading a translation at the two extremes: when it reads sublimely and I just know, without seeing the original, that something magical took place at the translator’s desk; and when, as is sometimes the case in translations of poetry, the translator, however dedicated and persevering, seems to be clawing at a veil that will not part. Poetry with no visceral impact is no poetry at all. Sometimes to be faithful to it, you do have to be a bit of a traitor.

Read the rest of this exclusive interview on translation.

Want to learn more about Donald Winkler? See his biography here.

Submit to Les poésies francophones du Canada: A Translation Prize.


Issues

Our Back Pages:
Issue #15, July 1970

Issue #15

Following the success of our 50 Issues Project, in which we highlighted select back issues in honour of the University of Victoria’s 50th anniversary, we decided to cast our gaze back, chronologically, over our complete backlist…to include (eventually!) brief reviews of every issue not previously covered. Featured issues will be highlighted on our website biweekly.

Rightfully, one-third of Issue #15 is dedicated to representative letters from Richard Aldington to Herbert Read, written between 1919 and 1961, though heavily weighted in the earlier years. Their warm friendship, based not only on acclaimed writing but also on shared WWI experiences, is intellectual and worldly—even if Read’s voice appears solely in contextual counterpoint. It’s compelling to read Aldington‘s thoughts and feelings about colleagues (and, at times, friends), such as Ezra Pound, James Joyce, and particularly, T. S. Eliot. Aldington and Read (who was well-known as an art critic), were industrious men who consciously explored philosophy within their lives, and this is woven into the letters.

Continue reading about Issue #15.

Learn more about Our Back Pages.


Interviews

Spotlight: Interview with Bruce Rice, winner of the 2014 P. K. Page Founders' Award for Poetry

Bruce RiceMalahat poetry intern Samantha Ainsworth recently interviewed Bruce Rice, winner of the 2014 P. K. Page Founders' Award for Poetry, and we're featuring it as a special spotlight interview. Anne Simpson chose Rice's poem "Into the Wind" as the best poem to have appeared in The Malahat Review in 2013. Read all about it on the 2014 Founders' Award announcement page.

SA: “Into the Wind” reads sideways along each page; its gentle lines trail out like long hair or loose clothing worn by a person marching headlong into a strong wind. Can you elaborate on this choice of poem shape, and use of white space on the page?

BR: Well, we do like leaning into the wind here. The length of the line is really about the breath, the extended rhythms that fit the distances and the contemplative voice of the poem, which is an elegy. But I also like the idea of the generosity of the long line, as opposed to shortline poems which can muster a lot of intensity, but they can also be reductive when the subject asks for more. I am a big fan of vernacular, and Dennis Cooley has written about the generosity of this kind of voice and speech.

Read the rest of Bruce's interview on his poetic process.

Discover Bruce's award-winning poem, "Into the Wind."


News

Dora Dueck, winner of the Malahat's 2014 Novella Prize contest

Dora DueckExciting news! Dora Dueck has won the 2014 Novella Prize with her piece, "Mask." Her entry was chosen from over 200 submissions by three judges: Pauline Holdstock, Greg Hollingshead, and Ann Ireland.

Dora is the author of two novels and a collection of short stories, as well as various articles and reviews. Her novel, This Hidden Thing (CMU Press, 2010), won the McNally Robinson Book of the Year Award at the 2011 Manitoba Book Awards, and What You Get at Home (Turnstone, 2012) won the 2013 High Plains Book Award in the short fiction category. She lives in Winnipeg, and is currently trying to complete another novel.

Thank you to everyone who entered this year's Novella contest!

See the announcement page for Dora Dueck's win.


Issues

Issue #186, Spring 2014 Book Reviews Online

Red Girl Rat Boy

The Malahat Review's spring issue will be shipped in the next few weeks, but you can get a sneak peek at the book reviews right now!

The upcoming issue features reviews of poetry by Gordon Johnston, Danny Jacobs, Maleea Acker, Catherine Greenwood, Don Domanski, and David Zieroth; fiction by Rita Donovan and Cynthia Flood; and nonfiction by Christina Johnson-Dean and Andrew Steinmetz.

Read the reviews from Issue #186's table of contents.


E-Newsletter

Malahat lite: April 2014 Edition

Issue 186 coverApril's edition of Malahat lite, the Malahat's virtual newsletter, offers a sneak peek at our upcoming Spring issue. Here's what's inside the newsletter:

Sneak peeks: an interview with Issue #186 contributor Michael Prior on three upcoming poems, and a podcast with Terence Young on his creative nonfiction piece. Terence's childhood home is the cover for Issue #186.

Contests: details on the 2014 Far Horizons Poetry Award (deadline May 1), featuring a catch-up interview with 2012's winner, Kayla Czaga; details on Les poésies francophones du Canada: A Translation Prize (deadline May 15), featuring an interview with GG-winner Donald Winkler, translation prize judge.

This issue also features an interview with Bruce Rice, winner of the 2014 P. K. Page Founders' Award for Poetry.

There's lots more in the newsletter! Read April's Malahat lite here.


Issues

Our Back Pages:
Issue #14, April 1970

Issue #14

Following the success of our 50 Issues Project, in which we highlighted select back issues in honour of the University of Victoria’s 50th anniversary, we decided to cast our gaze back, chronologically, over our complete backlist…to include (eventually!) brief reviews of every issue not previously covered. Featured issues will be highlighted on our website biweekly.

Issue #14 is a delightful exploration of literature and art from around the world. India-born Aijaz Ahmad collaborated with poets William Hunt, Mark Strand, William Stafford, and others, in translating a selection of ghazals (from the Urdu) by Ghalib, six of which are published here. Hagiwara Sakutaro brings a sense of Japanese community and naturalism to life with five poems translated by Graeme Wilson.

Continue reading about Issue #14.

Learn more about Our Back Pages.


News

Novella Prize Finalists Announced!

Novella PrizeFive finalists for the 2014 Novella Prize contest have been chosen! Author names and titles of pieces are available for viewing on the 2014 Novella Prize Finalists announcement page.

The winner will be announced by April 11 online.


News

2014 Founders' Awards Winners: Matt Rader and Bruce Rice

Jack HodginsThe Malahat Review congratulates Matt Rader, winner of the 2014 Jack Hodgins Founders' Award for Fiction; and Bruce Rice, winner of the 2014 P. K. Page Founders' Award for Poetry.

Michael Crummey chose "All This Was a Long Time Ago" by Rader as the best story to have appeared in the Malahat in 2013; Anne Simpson chose "Into the Wind" by Rice as the best poem.

Read the full announcement pages, with links to each winning piece, biographies, and judge citations.

Read an interview with Bruce Rice on his win. An interview with Matt Rader will be published in the May 2014 edition of Malahat lite, our virtual e-newsletter.


Interviews

Spotlight: Interview with Julie Bruck, Far Horizons Award Judge

Julie BruckAs a promo for the upcoming Far Horizons Poetry Award, Malahat volunteer Alexandra Handley interviewed contest judge Julie Bruck on the creative process and the importance of writing contests. The Far Horizons deadline is May 1, 2014.

AH: Did you submit to contests like the Far Horizons Award for Poetry when you first began publishing and sharing your work?

JB: Contests were less widespread when I started to send out work, but I did enter some, back when our poems had to be weighed on non-digital balance scales by a live human at the post office. Now that I think about it, there was something satisfying about having to let go of the physical object that way. Perhaps it made it easier to see the work as an entity separate from its maker, and for this reason, made the initial rejections easier to bear.

Read the rest of the interview here.


Issues

Translation Issue Deadline Extended!

At Home in Translation

Missed the March 15 deadline for the Malahat's first-ever translation issue, At Home in Translation? Never fear: you now have until April 15 (postmark date) to submit works of poetry, fiction, or creative nonfiction from any language into English.

The Malahat Review also invites thoughtful essays about the process of translation and the importance of translation today, as well as reviews of works in translation published by Canadian translators and/or Canadian publishers.

Full submission details can be found here.


Issues

Our Back Pages:
Issue #13, January 1970

Issue #13

Following the success of our 50 Issues Project, in which we highlighted select back issues in honour of the University of Victoria’s 50th anniversary, we decided to cast our gaze back, chronologically, over our complete backlist…to include (eventually!) brief reviews of every issue not previously covered. Featured issues will be highlighted on our website biweekly.

Issue #13 brings us into the fourth year of The Malahat Review and this issue has a little bit of everything. First up we have “Turnip Fields” a poem by Canadian poet John Thompson, whose tragic death occurred just six years later. Other poets of note include Austrian poet, George Trakl, whose poems are translated by Max Wickert, as well as Hayden Carruth and Kathleen Raine.

Continue reading about Issue #13.

Learn more about Our Back Pages.


Contests

Translation Prize Call for Submissions

Translation PrizeCalling all translators! The Malahat Review seeks entries from Canadian translators, poets, and passionate readers to submit to a one-time translation contest of les poésies francophones du Canada. A prize of $1000 will be awarded to the best translation of a poem in French, from Quebec or elsewhere in Canada, into English. The winning entry will be announced in early October 2014, and will be published in At Home in Translation, the Malahat's Fall 2014 issue dedicated entirely to translation. The winner will also be interviewed for Malahat lite and the Malahat website.

Deadline for submissions is May 15, 2014.

Want full contest details? Look no further.

Donald Winkler is the judge of the Malahat's one-time translation prize.
Read a biography of Winkler here.


Interviews

Spotlight: Open Season Award interview with Tajja Isen, Fiction category winner

Tajja IsenTajja Isen, winner of the 2014 Open Season Award for Fiction, was recently interviewed on her win by Malahat volunteer Sarah Brennan-Newell. Isen's story "The Anxiety of Influence" was chosen by judge and local Victoria writer Yasuko Thanh from over 150 short story contest entries!

Here's a sample of the interview:

SBN: What drew you to writing about the creation and maintenance of identity? Can you speak more broadly to the role of the other in defining the self? 

TI: The story explores several different “narratives” that we have at our disposal for self-definition—developmental psychology, literature, psychoanalysis—and I view the “other” as another tool in this arsenal; something we use to inform our own self-concept that, if handled carelessly, can become a convenient screen to hide behind, something of which my narrator is quite guilty.

Read the rest of the interview here.


Contests

Far Horizons Poetry Award Call for Submissions

Far Horizons Poetry AwardThe Malahat's 2014 Far Horizons Poetry Contest is open for submissions from poets everywhere. There's a $1000 prize to be won, and the contest entry fee is only $25. Entrants will receive a complimentary one-year subscription (or extension) to The Malahat Review. Deadline for submissions is May 1, 2014.

Get full details on entering the 2014 Far Horizons Award for Poetry.

Read a biography of Julie Bruck, this year's contest judge.

Looking for inspiration? Read about Kayla Czaga, who won this contest in 2012.


E-Newsletter

Malahat lite: March 2014 Edition

Julie BruckThe March edition of Malahat lite, the Malahat's monthly e-newsletter, is now online! Here's what's inside:

An interview with Julie Bruck, this year's judge for the Far Horizons Poetry Contest (deadline May 1).

Interviews with the Open Season 2014 Award winners: Joelle Barron (poetry), Tajja Isen (ficiton), and Kelly Cooper (creative nonfiction).

Details on how to submit to At Home in Translation, the Malahat's upcoming issue dedicated entirely to works of translation; and Les poésies du Canada: A Translation Prize (deadline May 15).

There's lots more in the newsletter! Read the March edition here.


Issues

Our Back Pages:
Issue #12, October 1969

Issue #12

Following the success of our 50 Issues Project, in which we highlighted select back issues in honour of the University of Victoria’s 50th anniversary, we decided to cast our gaze back, chronologically, over our complete backlist…to include (eventually!) brief reviews of every issue not previously covered. Featured issues will be highlighted on our website biweekly.

As the last of the decade, the twelfth issue of The Malahat Review is a testimony to the artists of the nineteenth century and how their works have remained an inspiration to writers a century later. With a variety of wonderful contributors, this issue showcases riveting poetry, fiction, essays, and more.

Continue reading about Issue #12.

Learn more about Our Back Pages.


Events

WordsThaw 2014 in Pictures

Yvonne BlomerThe Malahat's second annual writing symposium took place February 20-22 at the University of Victoria: a three-day literary feast of readings, panel discussions, interactive writing sessions, and more.

Maybe you couldn't make it to this year's WordsThaw, or maybe you attended all three days of readings and miss it dearly. Either way, head on over to the WordsThaw website for a sample of photos from the symposium.

If you took pictures at any of the events, email them to us and we'll post them online!


Issues

Our Back Pages:
Issue #10, April 1969

Issue #10

Following the success of our 50 Issues Project, in which we highlighted select back issues in honour of the University of Victoria’s 50th anniversary, we decided to cast our gaze back, chronologically, over our complete backlist…to include (eventually!) brief reviews of every issue not previously covered. Featured issues will be highlighted on our website biweekly.

The bulk of Issue #10 is another masterful installment of “An Atlas of Poetry.” This feature also appeared in Issue #6 and showcases poetry from around the globe. Notable contributors to this section include U.S. poet Donald Hall, Manuel Bandeira, a celebrated Brazilian poet; George Jonas, a Canadian writer from Budapest; Lucretius, a Roman poet and philosopher; and Christopher Levenson, one of the founders of Arc Poetry Magazine.

Continue reading about Issue #10.

Learn more about Our Back Pages.


News

Open Season Award Winners Announced!

Open Season AwardsCongratulations to the winners of our 2014 Open Season Award contest: Joelle Barron, for her poem "A Girl Like This Might Have Loved Glenn Gould"; Tajja Isen, for her short story "The Anxiety of Influence"; and Kelly Cooper, for her creative nonfiction piece "Ten Easy Steps." More information can be found on the Open Season Awards 2014 winners page, including comments from judges on the winning pieces, and bio notes on winners and judges.

Thank you to everyone who entered, and congratulations again!


Events

WordsThaw 2014 Interview: Amy Reiswig

Amy ReiswigIn preparation for WordsThaw, our second annual writing symposium, we've been posting interviews online with WordsThaw participants leading up to the three-day event, February 20 - 22.

Malahat Marketing & Promotional Assistant Rachel Lallouz recently spoke with Amy Reiswig on community, creative resistance, and commitment to one’s own writing. Amy will be the moderator for Shining a Light: Writer as Witness, 3:45 p.m. - 5:45 p.m. on Saturday, February 22.

RL: What do you hope to take away from WordsThaw this year?

AR: Cheap books at the book sale! Kidding. I don’t even know if they are having that this year. More seriously, I hope to just learn. I’m a taker-inner, a sponge. I hope to learn new perspectives and, naturally, new books I should be adding to my ever-expanding pile.

How would you describe the value that events like WordsThaw bring to the literary community in Victoria and beyond?

It’s a forum to listen, think and talk. So much discussion now happens online, and having an opportunity to come together over particular issues and actually ask questions, hear answers, and have dialogue keeps our minds limber, helps us feel more invested in the issues being discussed. An event like WordsThaw also reminds us what a wealth of great thinkers and writers we have locally! It’s amazing! We, the people in our community, are our most precious resource, and having a forum to tap into that face to face, meet and make connections, can be mind- and even life-changing.

Read the rest of Amy's interview on the WordsThaw website.

Learn more about the Shining a Light: Writer as Witness panel.


Issues

Our Back Pages:
Issue #9, January 1969

Issue #9

Following the success of our 50 Issues Project, in which we highlighted select back issues in honour of the University of Victoria’s 50th anniversary, we decided to cast our gaze back, chronologically, over our complete backlist…to include (eventually!) brief reviews of every issue not previously covered. Featured issues will be highlighted on our website biweekly.

What towering critic and novelist of the Twentieth Century could make famed founder of the Bauhaus school, Walter Gropius, pause to extol the value of kindness in art education? Or bring sculptor Henry Moore to such praise that "his work helped to change the whole situation for art" in Britain?

Continue reading about Issue #9.

Learn more about Our Back Pages.


E-Newsletter

Malahat lite: February 2014 Edition

WordsThaw 2014 full posterOur February edition of Malahat lite, our monthly e-newsletter, is now online! This special promo edition features all things WordsThaw, our annual writing symposium. Here's what's inside:

Interviews with WordsThaw participants Amy Reiswig, Aaron Shepard, and Madeline Sonik. Each interviewee talks about their involvement with WordsThaw, and the benefits of writing symposiums.

News articles about WordsThaw in Victoria, B.C. publications: The Ring, and Focus Magazine.

An interview with Issue #185, Winter 2013 contributor Kate Cayley on her story, "The Fetch."

Open Season 2014 Award finalists announced. Winners in all three genres (poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction) to be posted online by February 14.

There's lots more in the newsletter! Read the February edition here.


Events

WordsThaw 2014 Interview: Aaron Shepard

Aaron ShepardIn preparation for WordsThaw, our second annual writing symposium, we'll be posting interviews with Wordsthaw readers and panelists from now until the three-day event, February 20 - 22.

Malahat volunteer Melissa Hiebert spoke with Brief Encounters author Aaron Shepard about his upcoming novel, When is a Man, and the craft of writing. Aaron will be offering 15-minute critiques to WordsThaw pass holders as part of Brief Encounters on Saturday, February 22.

MH: Can you describe what it was like to write your upcoming book, When is a Man (published with Brindle and Glass in April 2014), and some of the good moments and bad moments you experienced throughout the process?

AS: I had a lot of fun moments writing the first third of the book, which I did during my MFA program, just because I had weeks and weeks to write and think, and I knew I’d likely never have that much free time to write again (I’ve been proven correct so far).

Read the rest of Aaron's interview on the WordsThaw website.

Learn more about 15-minute critiquing sessions with Brief Encounters authors.


News

Open Season 2014 Finalists Announced!

The finalists for our recent Open Season Award contest have been chosen! Author names and titles of pieces (poetry, fiction and creative nonfiction) are available for viewing on our Open Season 2014 Finalists page.

Be sure to check back next week, when we announce the winners in each category!


Issues

Our Back Pages:
Issue #7, July 1968

Issue #7

Following the success of our 50 Issues Project, in which we highlighted select back issues in honour of the University of Victoria’s 50th anniversary, we decided to cast our gaze back, chronologically, over our complete backlist…to include (eventually!) brief reviews of every issue not previously covered. Featured issues will be highlighted on our website biweekly.

Jean Cocteau's 1959 pen-and-ink self-portrait graces the cover of this issue, a hint of content to follow.  Sure enough, William Fifield starts us off with "Excerpts from Conversations with Jean Cocteau." This piece allows a glimpse into the French writer’s life, opinions, and what he had to say about some of his contemporaries, including Marcel Proust, Ernest Hemingway, Picasso, and Tennessee Williams.

Continue reading about Issue #7.

Learn more about Our Back Pages.


Events

Literary Victoria, January 27-31, 2014

Jay Ruzesky

What's happening around Victoria this week? WordsThaw sponsor Planet Earth Poetry hosts its Friday reading, and we're hosting a WordsThaw prequel event on Tuesday!

Tuesday, January 28:
The Malahat Review hosts CNF Night in Canada: A WordsThaw 2014 Prequel Event at Russell Books.

Friday, January 30:
Planet Earth Poetry features Melanie Siebert and Laurie D. Graham at the Moka House on Hillside Ave.

Click here for more information on these events.


Events

WordsThaw 2014 Interview: Madeline Sonik

Madeline SonikIn preparation for WordsThaw, our second annual symposium, we'll be posting interviews with Wordsthaw readers and panelists from now until the launch of the event!

Malahat editorial assistant Karyn Wisselink spoke with award-winning writer Madeline Sonik on her upcoming WordsThaw prequel event, and her thoughts on creative nonfiction. Madeline will be reading at CNF Night in Canada on Tuesday, January 28, 7:30 p.m. at Russell Books in downtown Victoria.

KB: You were a panelist at WordsThaw 2013 for the “In Our Names: Writers on Poverty” panel. What are some things you learned from being on the panel?

MS: I think one of the things that I learned was how prevalent the theme of poverty is in my memoir collection, Afflictions & Departures. I’d never consciously thought about how it applied to the realities of my young life because the term “poverty” is an abstraction, and as a writer, I’ve trained myself to think mostly in concrete terms. However, what I discovered was that “poverty,” as a label, is really useful in collating patterns. It helps you see the forest for the trees and the constellations for the stars. It helped me identify the persistence of a recurring note in my life’s narrative that I hadn’t even realized existed.

Read the rest of Madeline's interview on the WordsThaw website.

Details on CNF Night in Canada, the Malahat's upcoming WordsThaw prequel event.


E-Newsletter

Web Exclusive: The Human Family Tree

Odds and EndsFrom our January 2014 edition of Malahat lite: Volunteer Samantha Ainsworth explores the connections between Claire Kelly, Courtney Milne, and Emily Carr. Kelly's poem, "In the torso of a great windstorm," is discussed in Ainsworth's essay, along with the cover art from Issue 185, Winter 2013 in which Kelly's poem appears.

Read how poetry, photography, and oil paint come together in this web exclusive.

Discover past editions of Malahat lite, our monthly e-newsletter.


Events

Literary Victoria, January 20-26, 2014

Moka House

What's happening around Victoria this week?

Wednesday, January 22: Vancouver poet Gillian Jerome is part of the literary series Open Word: Readings and Ideas for January, and will be reading at the University of Victoria and again at Open Space downtown.

Friday, January 24: Planet Earth Poetry hosts its weekly reading series at Moka House on Hillside Avenue. This week's featured readers are Jen Currin and Rene Saklikar. There's also an open mic for any writer interested in sharing his or her work!

Click here for more information on these events.


Interviews

Letters between Canadian poets Earle Birney and Al Purdy

Nicholas BradleyFrom our January 2014 edition of Malahat lite: Nicholas Bradley, English professor at the University of Victoria, was recently interviewed by Malahat editor John Barton on correspondence between late Canadian poets Earle Birney and Al Purdy. The letters make up Bradley's contribution to Issue #185, Winter 2013, as an archive.

Read the interview between Barton and Bradley.

Discover past editions of Malahat lite, our monthly e-newsletter.


Issues

Issue #185: Hot Off the Press!

Issue #185Our latest issue, from winter 2013, is finally here! This issue features poetry from Daphne Marlatt, Shane Neilson, and Michael Kenyon; fiction from Kate Cayley and Anne Marie Todkill; and archived correspondence between late poets Al Purdy and Earle Birney, compiled by UVic English professor Nicholas Bradley. Lots more inside!

This issue also features book reviews of poetry by John Reibetanz, Russell Thornton and Susan Musgrave; fiction by paulo da costa and Colette Maitland; and nonfiction by Travis V. Mason.

Discover our latest issue here (also available for purchase!).


Issues

Our Back Pages:
Issue #6, April 1968

Issue #6

Following the success of our 50 Issues Project, in which we highlighted select back issues in honour of the University of Victoria’s 50th anniversary, we decided to cast our gaze back, chronologically, over our complete backlist…to include (eventually!) brief reviews of every issue not previously covered. Featured issues will be highlighted on our website biweekly.

Issue #6 includes a refreshing section entitled “An Atlas of Poetry,” featuring fifteen poets from around the world whose homelands range from Canada to Nigeria, from Sweden to Brazil, and beyond.  Daryl Hine, a well-known Canadian poet and translator is featured in this section with his poem “Point Grey.” U.S. author, May Sarton contributes her poem “After Anger,” and the emotion communicated here is palpable. “All day I have held a letter in my hand, / While anger shook me to shapeless distress.”

Continue reading about Issue #6.

Learn more about Our Back Pages.


E-Newsletter

Malahat lite: January 2014 Edition

Nicholas BradleyHappy New Year! We're pleased to bring you the first edition of Malahat lite for 2014. In this issue, you'll find:

An interview with Andrew Tibbetts, our 2008 Novella Prize winner, where we catch up with him since his win.

Information on all things WordsThaw, our upcoming February symposium (with two prequel events in January!), taking place at the University of Victoria.

Interviews with Issue #185, Winter 2013 contributors Nicholas Bradley and Simone Littledale.

A MalaPod podcast, also with Nicholas Bradley, on correspondence between the late poets Al Purdy and Earle Birney.

There's lots more in the newsletter! Read the January edition here.


Events

WordsThaw 2014 Website Launch!

WordsThaw 2014

The Malahat's annual symposium returns February 20 - 22 of the New Year! To celebrate, we've just launched a website exclusive to all things WordsThaw.

You'll find information on panelists, prequel events, symposium schedules, ticket sales, and more!

This website will be updated regularly throughout January and February, so check back often to see what's new!

Click here for WordsThaw 2014 information on our Events page.


Issues

Our Back Pages:
Issue #4, October 1967

Issue #4

Following the success of our 50 Issues Project, in which we highlighted select back issues in honour of the University of Victoria’s 50th anniversary, we decided to cast our gaze back, chronologically, over our complete backlist…to include (eventually!) brief reviews of every issue not previously covered. Featured issues will be highlighted on our website biweekly.

Issue #4 is full of translations and has a Latin-American edge. Lysander Kemp translates the works of three Mexican poets, including Octavio Paz, while William Stafford and Herbert Baird translate the works of three Spanish poets. Daniel Cosio Villegas discusses the still-timely topic of the relationship between the United States and Cuba in an essay entitled “The United States and Cuba: A Latin-American View.”

Continue reading about Issue #4.

Learn more about the Our Back Pages project.


Issues

Issue #185, Winter 2013 Book Reviews Online

Issue #185

Can't wait until our next issue prints after the holidays? You can get a preview of contents, and book reviews, right now!

This issue features book reviews of poetry by John Reibetanz, Russell Thornton and Susan Musgrave; fiction by paulo da costa and Colette Maitland; and nonfiction by Travis V. Mason.

Read the reviews on our upcoming issue table of contents.


Interviews

Inside Issue #184: Cave Drawings as a Newsfeed from the Prehistoric World

Concetta PrincipeThe Malahat's editor, John Barton, recently interviewed Concetta Principe on her poem entitled "Theses on the Philosophy of Waiting," which appeared in our Autumn 2013 issue.

JB: "Theses on the Philosophy of Waiting” is a textured, 10-part poem about the Chauvet Cave in France, an archeological site known for its primitive cave drawings. Your response to it is not a direct one, but is filtered through German director Werner Herzog’s recent documentary, Cave of Forgotten Dreams. As I understand it, the French government has sealed off the cave from the public in order to protect it. Can you shed some light on why you found the cave and the film so compelling?

CP: I saw the film with my son in the afternoon of a hot summer day and the theatre was freezing. It was also very dark. This environment somehow amplified the experience of discovering the cave paintings through Herzog’s 3D film. In the movie, the archaeological investigation of the cave became secondary to the phenomenon of the ancient art. There were so many layers of images across the cave walls that you could almost trace the dialogue the ancient artists had with each other through their paintings. What compelled these artists to draw these images?

Read the rest of Concetta's interview here.


News

Naben Ruthnum wins 2013 Writers' Trust of Canada/McClelland & Stewart Journey Prize

Naben RuthnumExciting news! On November 20th, at the Writers’ Trust of Canada Awards in Toronto, Malahat contributor Naben Ruthnum won the 2013 Writers' Trust of Canada/McClelland & Stewart Journey Prize for his short story, “Cinema Rex.” Naben received a $10,000 cash prize for his win.

This is the seventh time that a Malahat author has won the Journey Prize in its 25-year history, more often than any other Canadian literary magazine!

Read more on Naben's win here.

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CONTEST
DEADLINES

Aug 1, 2014

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Nov 1, 2014

Open Season Awards

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Long Poem Prize

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